Jack Kerwick

To the proliferation of articles on the shooting death of black Missourian Michael Brown via white police officer, Darren Wilson, I register the following considerations.

Firstly, at this time when black underclass thugs are ruining the quality of life in but another once- decent town while their black and white media spokespersons bellyache over the unrelenting racial oppression to which black Americans are supposedly subject, let us call to mind all of the rosy promises made six years ago when Barack Hussein Obama first set his sights on the presidency.

Pundits both black and white, Democrat and Republican, assured us that the election of a black man with an Islamic-sounding name was sure to endear America to Muslims around the globe while ushering in a “post-racial” era here at home. Remember that?

The Islamic world, always a cauldron of violence, is even more violent, more emboldened now than it has been in the past. Something similar can be said for the world of black America, or at least black urban America—as the current happenings in Ferguson, Missouri painfully reveal.

Secondly, those “conservative” commentatorswho claim to be agnostic on whether Darren Wilson, in the absence of any provocation on the part of Michael Brown, killed the latter solely for thrills imply that they’re open to the possibility that this actually could have happened. In other words, they legitimize the outrageous notion that white police officers routinely seek out unsuspecting, law-abiding black citizens to gun down.

I’ll say it now: While, admittedly, I do not know the details of what actually transpired between Wilson and Brown, I most certainly do know—and so, too, I’m ready to bet, does every other commentator who isn’t an anti-white, anti-police ideologue—that Officer Wilson is not guilty of any of the charges that the black criminals in Ferguson and their apologists in Washington D.C. and the media are leveling against him.

Wilson is a decorated police officer. Brown was a thug who just moments prior to his fatal encounter with Wilson had been captured on video surveillance engaging in a strong-arm robbery of a convenience store.

This is one reason why my I’m strongly disposed to sympathize with Wilson’s and the Ferguson Police Department’s account of events over that supplied by Dorian Johnson, the 22 year-old who was with Brown when he was killed—and who served as his accomplice to the robbery and assault of a clerk.

But there is another reason why I believe Wilson acted justifiably. And this brings me to my third piece of food for thought:


Jack Kerwick

Jack Kerwick received his doctoral degree in philosophy from Temple University. His area of specialization is ethics and political philosophy. He is a professor of philosophy at several colleges and universities in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Jack blogs at Beliefnet.com: At the Intersection of Faith & Culture. Contact him at jackk610@verizon.net or friend him on facebook. You can also follow him on twitter.