Dr. Ben Carson

A few years ago, I was participating in a national radio interview when the questioner asked me, "Dr. Carson, I notice that you don't speak very often about race. Why is that?" I replied, "It's because I'm a neurosurgeon."

The puzzled look on her face demanded further clarification.

I proceeded to explain that when I take a patient to the operating room and open the cranium, exposing the brain, I am operating on the actual thing that makes that person who they are. The hair, scalp and skull bones are merely external coverings of the critical entity — the brain — that determines all of the most important things about us as human beings. We have a choice of concentrating on superficial characteristics, which mean little or nothing, or concentrating on the source of our humanity, our intellect, our personality and the content of our character.

A few weeks ago, during her television program on the Fox News Channel, Megyn Kelly made reference to the racial makeup of Jesus Christ and Santa Claus. She indicated that in American culture they are usually portrayed as Caucasian. This ignited a firestorm of protests and disagreement, as do many innocent remarks in today's hypersensitive culture. There was little discussion of who Jesus Christ was or his message, nor was there much reference to the symbolism of Santa Claus. Instead, accusations of racist tendencies were leveled.

In the Bible, many characters are described in some detail when it is relevant to the story being told. The fact that there is little or nothing describing the physical appearance of Jesus should serve as an indicator of the irrelevance of racial descriptions for someone with such an important mission.

Why do we in America, almost half a century after the death of Martin Luther King, still continue to make judgments based on the color of one's skin rather than the content of one's character? Those who seem most concerned about race are the so-called "progressives," some of whom claim that if we stop fanning the flames of racial injustice, we will return to the days when racial prejudice was acceptable.

This kind of pessimism is unwarranted, and we need to remember that a great deal of the racism of the past was based on total ignorance, which bred fear and hatred. Those wishing to maintain the unjust status quo were in no hurry to allow the truth to be revealed to whites or blacks about the other side, because such revelations would dispel myths and foster harmony.

Thus, segregation and blissful ignorance were maintained at all costs. The fear and loathing that characterize the political atmosphere in America today are also based on ignorance.