Derek Hunter
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Charles M. Blow, communist, er, columnist for The New York Times, pulled back the curtain on the progressive mindset a little this week, as much as there is a mind behind it. Upon hearing something Mitt Romney said about single parents, Blow, who apparently is one, took exception. On Twitter he sent out the following:

Let me just tell you this Mitt "Muddle Mouth": I'm a single parent and my kids are *amazing*! Stick that in your magic underwear.

For those who don’t know, the website Buzzfeed describes the “magic underwear” this way, “Mormon men and women wear "temple garments" beneath their clothes as a reminder of their religious commitments, a rough equivalent of Jews' yarmulkes or tzitzit.”

That, of course, makes Blow’s tweet an attack on Romney’s Mormon faith, done willingly and before the whole world.  At a time when ESPN fires a writer for using the common phrase “Chink in the Armor” to describe a bad game by Jeremy Lin because Lin happens to be Asian, you’d think the blowback on Blow would be swift. You would be wrong. There was no blowback – or at least none to speak of.

Had Blow been anything but a progressive, the media would have opened up on him like he was Pat Buchanan, and justifiably so. But if you’re a leftist you’re allowed to be a bigot. It’s practically required.

In the progressive world people can’t be looked at as individuals. They must be divided and subdivided so the “professional Left” can set about making them victims when it suits their needs. It’s the hyphenated Americans, the gender Americans, the Americans who like to do this with their genitals. It’s the ones with this color skin, or that color skin, it’s this one and that one and blah, blah.

They create these groups, then tell people to identify with “their groups,” so, when a member of that group is the victim of something, it’s an affront to all of them.

It’s the mentality that created a group called the Asian American Journalist Association and emboldened it, without invitation, to release guidelines for how the media needs to cover Jeremy Lin. See, you can’t treat Jeremy Lin like any other human being, or even any other basketball player. He’s different. His ancestors were of Asian descent.

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Derek Hunter

Derek Hunter is Washington, DC based writer, radio host and political strategist. You can also stalk his thoughts 140 characters at a time on Twitter.