Guys, If Only Someone Made Ma'Khia Byrant a Sandwich, She Might Be Alive Right Now

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Posted: May 06, 2021 4:00 PM

What in the fresh hell is this? It’s laughable. It’s disturbing. It’s emblematic of liberal America leaving planet Earth—literally. There was initial outrage over the Ma’Khia Byrant shooting in Columbus, Ohio last month. It occurred on the day of the Derek Chauvin verdict, April 20. The liberal media tried to frame this as another George Floyd. Then, the bodycam footage was released showing Bryant trying to stab another girl. The 911 call described Byrant as assaulting and attempting to stab people. At that moment, the responding officer had seconds to act. He had to take a life to save another. And yet, liberals do not understand that; they don’t want to. We had idiotic debates about whether the officer could have shot Bryant in the hand or leg. That’s total ignorance when it comes to police policy. There’s a reason why they’re trained to hit center mass. It’s the largest part of the body which decreases the chances of innocent bystanders being hit in the case a police officer needs to use his or her service weapon. The arm and leg are small targets, even smaller when people are moving. Also, what was Bryant’s dad doing just standing there? 

The use of deadly force really isn’t a debate right now. Even CNN’s Don Lemon and Chris Cuomo shockingly said this was a good shoot. They noted the knife. They noted that not all police shootings are the same. The bodycam footage ends the false BLM narrative about policing in America, but Vox wasn’t done just yet. Recently, they said that Bryant could have been saved if—get this—a mental health expert had responded instead of the police. Apparently, if sandwiches were made, this could have been avoided or something (via Vox):

My first encounter of a teenager with a weapon was when I was a 23-year-old intern providing services at a youth foster home. I received a call from a foster mother about a dispute that occurred between two teens. I could hear them yelling and cursing at each other in the background, and I told the mother to put me on speaker so that I could talk to them as I was driving over.

On the phone, I calmly asked the teens questions intended to distract them away from the dispute. “Did you eat today?” “Don’t you have soccer practice in a bit?” and “You’re holding a brick?! Okay, Bob the Builder, where did you find that?!” As I entered the house, I concealed my badge — some people tend to distrust anyone resembling authority, and this fear often presents as anger, which is then misinterpreted as a threat. The teens were standing in the bedroom, one with a knife and the other a brick, ready to fight.

It was undoubtedly a scary situation, and someone could have been hurt. But I knew as a trained professional that employing nonviolent deescalation techniques was not only possible but necessary to stop an aggressive interaction from becoming violent or even fatal. The goal is to provide crisis intervention services and keep kids safe — and avoid any ending up like Ma’khia Bryant, the 16-year-old Black girl who was shot by a police officer last week while wielding a knife.

It was undoubtedly a scary situation, and someone could have been hurt. But I knew as a trained professional that employing nonviolent deescalation techniques was not only possible but necessary to stop an aggressive interaction from becoming violent or even fatal. The goal is to provide crisis intervention services and keep kids safe — and avoid any ending up like Ma’khia Bryant, the 16-year-old Black girl who was shot by a police officer last week while wielding a knife.

Inside the house, I did not yell, nor did I order the teens to drop their weapons. Instead, I asked whether they wanted something to eat. Confused and suddenly distracted by me, neither responded, but when I walked over to the kitchen and started making them food, they followed me.

As I made them sandwiches, I asked them to help me with tasks, such as working together to set the table. I initially had them talk directly to me and not to each other. After a few minutes, both teens had left their weapons on the counter and were helping. Once emotions were regulated, we talked through the initial issue and resolved it, making a plan with the foster mom and my clinical supervisor about what to do should this happen again in the future.

You can read more, but there was no time to engage in 'Dr. Katz, professional therapist' here. Bryant would have stabbed the girl and possibly killed her. So, physical harm is ok in some situations. Talk about a perverse way to view risk assessment. 

‘The girl Bryant stabbed died, but at least Bryant wasn’t shot by the police' ... is that where we’re going here in liberal America? This is why liberal America is viewed as soft on crime. This isn’t an academic exercise. Someone could have died, and you can’t hash out the theories outlines in past honors theses in mere seconds. Sorry, not realistic at all, but this is Vox—where you often find yourselves in la-la land.  

H/T Twitchy