TV Guide's Hit Piece on Chris Pratt's 'Problematic' Life as a Farmer Is Everything Wrong With Hollywood

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Posted: Dec 26, 2018 6:10 PM
TV Guide's Hit Piece on Chris Pratt's 'Problematic' Life as a Farmer Is Everything Wrong With Hollywood

Hollywood elites are no stranger to the finer things in life. Luxurious cars. Extravagant homes. Lavish lifestyles. It's part of the territory that comes with being famous. 

Actor Chris Pratt, best known for his role as Andy in "Parks and Recreation," lives a different lifestyle than many of his Hollywood comrades. In fact, he has a farm and raises his own animals to feed his family. But now the simplistic lifestyle is being labeled as "problematic" by TV Guide:

When you take a deeper look at Pratt the man and not necessarily Pratt the actor, some of the shine wears off. Although he can be as funny offscreen as he is on — his recurring "What's My Snack" videos on Instagram are almost always delightful — it's impossible to ignore some problematic aspects of his life offscreen.

For instance, animals: In 2011, Pratt apparently tried to give his family's aging cat away via Twitter, though he later gave an explanation (future children) and said the cat eventually found a good home. (Five years later, there was also a bizarre tabloid story about Pratt and then-wife Anna Faris' attempt to rehome the family's dog.)

Adding fuel to this particular fire is the fact that Pratt, an avid hunter who has often spoken about his love of hunting, currently raises lambs on his farm. The enthusiastic tone he took when speaking about "eating fresh farm-to-table lamb" in an Instagram video earlier this year — "They are the happiest lambs on the planet, they are so sweet and then one day they wake up dead and they're in my freezer" — sparked backlash from a number of fans, and not just those who are vegetarians or vegans. The next day, Pratt posted a photo of several pieces of fresh lamb meat and even compared said lamb's death to something as easy or trivial as "unplugging a TV."

This is the video the author was referring to:

Here's the thing that Hollywood elites, including the author of this hit piece, fail to realize: everyone talks about eating non-GMO, all organic, healthy food but no meat is as clean or safe as raising your own food. You know exactly what and how much they're being fed. You know if the animal has been sick, needed medical treatment – including antibiotics – and the kind of living conditions they were raised in.

You would think more Hollywood liberals would jump on this bandwagon. Farm-to-table is the healthiest, most sustainable way of living. And guess what? That's how most of the country, you know, those of us who live in flyover, live. We raise our own cattle, pigs, goats and sheep. We have chickens to lay fresh eggs and rely on our hunting skills for wild game. 

So thank you, TV Guide, for not only insulting Chris Pratt's way of life but for also insulting the rest of us average, everyday folk who can't afford to go to the Whole Foods down the street to pick up tofu and soy beans for dinner. 

If anything, you should be applauding Pratt's passion for the outdoors and "becoming one" with nature.

He's growing his own garden:

 





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Get you a tomato. #farmlife

A post shared by  chris pratt (@prattprattpratt) on

Having fresh eggs delivered daily:

Utilizing every aspect of his land:

Tending to his herd:

 





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No filter #farmlife

A post shared by  chris pratt (@prattprattpratt) on

And even finding joy in the miracle of life:

Instead of looking down at Pratt's way of life, Hollywood elites could learn a thing or two from how he feeds his family and finds joy in the simple things of life. It's easy to say things like killing innocent animals is disgusting and heartless but here's the cold, hard truth: humans were made to eat meat. We were never intended to live off plants. We're carnivores. That's just fact. When you grow and hunt your own food, you're given a greater appreciation for the great outdoors, God's gift of life and you're more likely to cherish and utilize every last aspect of the animal you harvested.