It Took $1.1 Million And 835 Dumpsters, But The Dakota Access Pipeline Protest Camps Have Been Cleaned Out

Matt Vespa
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Posted: Mar 14, 2017 8:00 PM
It Took $1.1 Million And 835 Dumpsters, But The Dakota Access Pipeline Protest Camps Have Been Cleaned Out

Donald Trump won the presidency. He signed an executive order to get the Dakota Access and Keystone pipeline projects moving—and the environmental left has been defeated. They caused much grief when they descended into North Dakota to make a stand for mother Earth. Now that the project is back on track, they left, among other things, mountains of garbage as they vacated the area. Additionally, they left their pets as well. Local animal rescue groups have been combing the protest camps searching for abandoned dogs. They also set their camp on fire. In an ironic twist, the amount of waste left at these sites presented a danger that it could pollute waterways if the spring melt washes this garbage and debris into the Missouri River system; this is one of the main reasons why green protesters staged a weeks-long campaign against the pipeline project.

Well, it’s all done now at the cost of $1.1 million and 835 dumpsters worth of trash (via Washington Times):

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers wrapped up its $1.1 million cleanup of the Dakota Access pipeline protest camps on federal land in North Dakota, hauling away 835 dumpsters of remaining trash and debris. The site, once occupied by thousands of environmental demonstrators, is now vacant.

The federal cleanup at the last of the three camps, Sacred Stone, was declared finished Thursday.

A Florida sanitation company completed work that began Feb. 23 to hasten the massive restoration project started in late January by the Standing Rock Sioux.

Meanwhile, a local animal shelter rescued four more dogs found at the North Dakota encampment, bringing the total number of dogs found after the last of the protesters evacuated to 12.


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