You'll Never Guess What Happened To This Woman Who Used The Men's Restroom at a Concert

Katie Pavlich
|
Posted: May 11, 2016 2:45 PM
You'll Never Guess What Happened To This Woman Who Used The Men's Restroom at a Concert

Over the past few weeks, there's been escalating controversy surrounding North Carolina's "bathroom bill," House Bill 2. 

Here's the short version: 

-North Carolina passed a state wide law requiring people to use restrooms in government buildings pertaining to their biological sex at birth. There is an allocation in the law for new, single-occupancy restrooms to be made available. Private businesses are able to make their own restroom policies.

-Transgender persons choose a restroom based on gender identification, not sex.

-The Justice Department told North Carolina their law violates civil rights on the basis of sex discrimination. 

-North Carolina sued, saying sex, not gender, is defined in federal law and argued courts and Congress should clarify the Civil Rights Act surrounding the issue of gender identification. 

-DOJ counter sued, asking a judge for an injunction. 

So, that brings me to this story. A woman in North Dakota was thrown out of a Garth Brooks concert (do you have any idea how hard Garth Brooks tickets are to get?!) recently for using a men's bathroom before the show. Presumably, she used the bathroom because there was a short line and women's line is always much longer. 

 A woman who admitted to using the men's room at a Fargo, North Dakota, concert venue where country superstar Garth Brooks was playing over the weekend said she was unfairly booted because of her brazen bathroom etiquette.

Samantha Bergh told NBC affiliate KVLY that she only commandeered a commode in a FargoDome men's restroom because she was desperate.

"The women's line was a good 100-people long," she said Monday. "It was insanely long and there was no wait for the men's, so I just went into the men's.

But her potty behavior didn't sit well with management. A security guard and Fargo police escorted her and her husband out of the arena, Bergh said.

Under DOJ's standard, she should have said she identified as a man that day and everything would have been fine.