Guy Benson
Much has been made of the Republican National Committee's precarious financial position heading into the 2012 cycle, and there's no disputing that Reince Priebus has his work cut out for him.  Slightly off the radar, however, is the dire financial state of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC), which is fresh off its 63-seat whooping of three months ago.  Democrats say they "only" have to win 25 seats to win back the House next year.  Setting aside the fact that 25 seats is a daunting task historically speaking -- last year's tidal wave notwithstanding -- House Democrats will also be relying on a campaign arm whose finances are in disarray.

A Republican source passes along the following chart, which compares the DCCC's current money mess with its Republican counterpart's (comparatively sunny) debt figures after the dreadful 2006 cycle, when Democrats gained 31 seats and the majority:


DCCC

NRCC

2006 Year End Reports

CoH: $776,987
Debt: $9,311,416

CoH: $1,423,114
Debt: $14,474,946

2010 Year End Reports

CoH: $805,000
Debt: $19,000,000

CoH: $2,540,000
Debt: $10,500,000


In late 2006, Washington politicos were abuzz about the NRCC's calamitous finances:

Although both Congressional committees have deep debts, the Democrats will have an easier time repaying theirs because the election gave them control of the House, ensuring more donations from influence-seekers.

People are going to be clamoring to give to the Democrats,” Mr. Rothenberg said. “For the Republicans, it is going to be pulling teeth, especially with a presidential race coming up” and its competition for contributions, he said.


Today, the DCCC finds itself in a similar, but markedly worse, position.  $5 million worse, in fact. 

Guy Benson

Guy Benson is Townhall.com's Senior Political Editor. Follow him on Twitter @guypbenson.

Author Photo credit: Jensen Sutta Photography