Daniel Doherty

Ever since Hillary Clinton asserted that she wasn’t “truly well off” compared to other fabulously rich one-percenters (despite her family’s personal wealth and all evidence to the contrary) she’s had her (ahem) fair share of struggles convincing ordinary Americans she occupies the same world as them. The remark is especially tone-deaf given that she reportedly asks for at least six-figures every time she delivers a paid speech.

The median household income in the United States is roughly $44,000.

But the extent of her speaking fee demands go well beyond mere dollars and cents. As The Las Vegas Review-Journal exclusively reports:

According to a May 31, 2013 email, Clinton’s standard contract usually includes:

* Round-trip transportation on a chartered private jet “e.g., a Gulfstream 450 or larger jet,” plus round-trip business class travel for two advance staffers who will arrive up to three days in advance.

* Hotel accommodations selected by Clinton’s staff and including “a presidential suite for Secretary Clinton and up to three (3) adjoining or contiguous single rooms for her travel aides and up to two (2) additional single rooms for the advance staff.”

* A $500 travel stipend to cover out-of-pocket costs for Clinton’s lead travel aide.

* Meals and incidentals for Clinton, her travel aides and advance staff, as well as all phone charges.

* Final approval of all moderators or introducers.

The Review-Journal also notes that her speech at the University of Nevada’s 2012 “Foundation dinner," in particular, underscores Hillary’s lavish demands and preferences on the speaking circuit:

In fact, the former president spoke at the 2012 UNLV Foundation dinner, taking home a $250,000 fee. His spouse will get $225,000 to speak at the annual dinner. The size of Hillary Clinton’s fee has come under fire from critics who question the large expense in an era when students are hard-pressed to cover tuition and leave school saddled with massive debt.

But Clinton’s $225,000 is something of a cut-rate. Documents obtained by the newspaper show that she initially asked for $300,000 and reveal that she insists on controlling every detail of the private event, large and small, to ensure that she will be the center of attention.

“It is agreed that Speaker will be the only person on the stage during her remarks,” according to the May 13 contract the Harry Walker Agency signed for Clinton’s keynote address at the Bellagio.

According to her standard speaking contract, Clinton will remain at the event no longer than 90 minutes; will pose for no more than 50 photos with no more than 100 people; and won’t allow any press coverage or video- or audio-taping of her speech.

A six-figure fee, presidential lodgings, complete control over the logistics of the event, and media censorship were only some of Hillary Clinton’s stipulations when delivering paid remarks at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas two years ago.

Parting question: How will these revelations play with the Democratic base? Will she get a free pass since she reportedly gives all of her earnings to “charity” (i.e. her own foundation), or will she be heavily criticized for hypocrisy, greed, and self-indulgence?


Daniel Doherty

Daniel Doherty is Townhall's Deputy News Editor. Follow him on Twitter @danpdoherty.

Author Photo credit: Jensen Sutta Photography