Cortney O'Brien

The annual ESPYs awards are held to honor the year’s most inspiring athletes. Wednesday’s award presentation was no different, recognizing talents like Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps, Superbowl winners the Seattle Seahawks, and the United States men’s national soccer team that represented us so impressively at the World Cup. But, the show's host, a singer known as Drake, managed to briefly turn attention away from these sports stars' incredible achievements by invoking racism during his monologue.

The segment in question started with a rather harmless joke about Richard Sherman being vain, to a slightly offensive joke about white people drinking almond milk, then a downright accusatory jab at the Washington Redskins owners for their “racist" team name:

“No, I love Richard Sherman man,” Drake went on. “Sherman’s my guy! Like, he’s so entertaining! Richard Sherman pissed off more white people this year than a crowded parking lot at Whole Foods. (They hate when they can’t get their almond milk, you know what I’m saying?)

“Now look, some rough words in football this year,” Drake said. “Riley Cooper said some things. Richie Incognito said some things. I just want to stress that there’s no room for racism in the NFL — unless you own a team in Washington, D.C. Then it’s a go.”

The audience reaction was hushed and, when the camera panned to the crowd, it showed attendees squirming in their seats.

Political correctness has no place in culture and certainly no place on the football field. Being constantly concerned with offending people just puts everyone on edge - like Drake's uncomfortable ESPYs audience. Many people have offered their opinions one way or another in regards to a Redskins name change, but if the team is forced to change its name, where does it end? Dr. Ben Carson penned a wonderful piece on “The Insidious Effect of Political Correctness,” in which he writes, “Political correctness is antithetical to our founding principles of freedom of speech and freedom of expression. Its most powerful tool is intimidation.” I can't put it any better.

Drake is a singer by profession. Perhaps because he now has experience hosting Saturday Night Live, he also thinks he’s a comedian.

Watch his whole monologue here and decide for yourself:


Cortney O'Brien

Cortney O'Brien is a Townhall web editor. Follow her on Twitter @obrienc2.

Author Photo credit: Jensen Sutta Photography