Rebecca Hagelin

Darkness fell across the land and the man they thought would be their savior cried out in a loud voice, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” Soon after, he breathed his last.

The people standing at the foot of the cross beat their breasts and stumbled away. From a distance, his mother and friends watched in silent despair.

His disciples were broken in spirit—no doubt confused, hurting and angry. They had followed this man for years, left their work and their families for him. They thought he would change everything. But in the course of one day, all of their hopes were dashed.

They all felt the sting of betrayal when Judas brought the soldiers to the garden to arrest Jesus. Later, Peter anguished at the darkness of his own heart after he denied his closest friend. Their miracle-worker kept still as he was accused, remained silent as he was beaten, and carried his own cross. They heard the crowd mocking him, telling him to save himself, and his followers swelled with anticipation waiting to see him do it. Surely, he would. But instead, he gave up his spirit.

How many times have you felt the sting of betrayal in your own life? How long have you been haunted by your own conscience? How often are you consumed by bitter disappointment? How easily confused are you when things don’t go according to plan? Is there no justice in this world?

How are we ever to believe the promise in Romans that “all things work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to His purpose?” Does it really mean all things? Our own sin, injustice, even death itself?

The world has never seen a graver injustice than the death of Jesus. The only man who lived without sin of any kind was tortured and crucified. As the Prince of Peace suffered, the adversary rejoiced in his sickening, preverted understanding of victory.

Yet what seemed like victory for the powers of darkness, God used for the salvation of all mankind. What seemed like sure defeat was the greatest gain.

How To Save Your Family: Consider Easter

Good Friday is only good because we know the rest of the story. Even the darkest day can be called good when you see it from God’s perspective. The power of God raised Jesus to life again, defeating the power of sin, defeating the power of death itself. God dealt a decisive blow to our enemy, and we reap the benefits of his victory. Without Good Friday, there would be no Easter. Without Easter, there would be no Christianity, so let us consider the story again and learn what we can from it.


Rebecca Hagelin

Rebecca Hagelin is a public speaker on the family and culture and the author of the new best seller, 30 Ways in 30 Days to Save Your Family.
 
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