Phyllis Schlafly

Tom Donohue, U.S. Chamber of Commerce president, just hurled a challenge to Republicans. If they don't pass amnesty for illegal aliens, they "shouldn't bother to run a candidate in 2016."

Somebody probably told him that outrageous statement was a gaffe, which means the inconvenient revelation of an embarrassing viewpoint, so Donohue tried to pass off his threat as a joke. But it isn't funny: Donohue's big-business members want us to import more low-paid workers, and they want them now, suggesting that this fall's lame duck session of Congress would be a good time to implement this racket.

And it is a racket. It's a carefully planned, well-financed scheme to use false arguments to import foreign workers who will keep wages depressed for American college graduates.

Every time the amnesty issue comes up, and we remind the advocates that it will severely disadvantage low-paid and entry-level American workers by swamping the market with a flood of immigrants to compete for their jobs and depress wages, business leaders offer a compromise. They argue that at least we must accept guest workers on H-1B visas because U.S. STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) graduates are in short supply.

We are even told we should welcome them because the foreign STEM graduates are the best and the brightest. That's false and also insulting. In the age of political correctness, American STEM graduates should be invited to cry discrimination and demand apologies.

As President Barack Obama was hopping around in May from one high-dollar Democratic fundraiser to another, he used the famous pen of his imperial presidency to create a new category of guest workers for which he has no statutory authority. He will unilaterally allow the spouses of H1-B visa holders to take U.S. jobs.

Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Alabama, who is the best friend of American workers, says that Obama's proposal to create 100,000 more guest worker permits for the spouses of H-1B holders is a plan that will keep 100,000 Americans from finding jobs.

The United States already has more than twice as many workers with STEM degrees as there are STEM jobs. The Economic Policy Institute, the RAND Corporation, the Urban Institute and the National Research Council have all found no evidence that STEM workers are in short supply.

There are more than 5 million native-born Americans with STEM degrees working in non-STEM occupations, and an additional 1.2 million STEM graduates who are unemployed. There is absolutely no STEM worker shortage.


Phyllis Schlafly

Phyllis Schlafly is a national leader of the pro-family movement, a nationally syndicated columnist and author of Feminist Fantasies.
 
TOWNHALL DAILY: Be the first to read Phyllis Schlafly‘s column. Sign up today and receive Townhall.com daily lineup delivered each morning to your inbox.