Phyllis Schlafly
The China problem is not just that China is raking in trillions of dollars because of Obama's spending and borrowing binges, and it's not just that government policies encourage well-paying U.S. manufacturing jobs to move overseas. An even bigger problem is that the Obama administration is about to give Communist China some of our most precious and up-to-date military technology.

This particular chicanery started when the Obama administration foolishly tried to use taxpayers' money to force green energy to replace fossil fuels. But green energy can't compete in the free market because it's so much more expensive to produce.

Obama gave a half-billion U.S. tax dollars to Solyndra to subsidize making solar panels, yet the company promptly went bankrupt. Then Obama awarded a grant of $250 million of Stimulus money to a firm called A123 to make batteries for electric cars, which also went bankrupt and now is trying to pay off its investors by auctioning the company.

The high bidder at $256 million in a December auction was the Wanxiang Group, which has close ties to Communist China's government. Its chief executive is one of the wealthiest men in China, a prominent figure in the Chinese Communist Party.

This sale is dangerous to U.S. security because it involves the transfer of advanced battery technology using lithium iron phosphate, which produces longer life, lighter weight, higher power and more stable batteries that can operate in both very low and very high temperatures. In China's hands, the new A123 technology will threaten U.S. electrical power and communications grids.

China is eager for this acquisition because of its potential use in space weapons, anti-satellite missiles, lasers, and counter-space systems. Retired Navy Vice Admiral Barry Costello, former commander of the Navy's Third Fleet, says the sale of A123 will give a big boost to China's military expansion and warfare capability in space, cyber warfare and unmanned vehicles, all of which rely on battery power.

One option considered is to sell only the commercial technology to Wanxiang and sell its U.S. defense contracts to a U.S. firm, Navitas Systems. But pretending that A123's advanced technology can be sold to China only for business purposes is a pipe dream.

A123 employs more than 100 scientists and engineers working on sensitive materials that are part of what is scheduled to be sold to Wanxiang. If China gets access to A123's commercial applications, it will be easy for China to reverse-engineer the military applications.


Phyllis Schlafly

Phyllis Schlafly is a national leader of the pro-family movement, a nationally syndicated columnist and author of Feminist Fantasies.
 
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