Paul Rondeau
Let me commit political heresy in this presidential election year: It’s not the economy, stupid! Our first freedoms—those freedoms enumerated in the First Amendment—are being recklessly discarded by the ruling class in favor of government ideology. It seems that America’s citizenry has become so numb to outrageous political acts that even trampling our constitutional rights barely raises an eyebrow.

If we remember back to when schools actually taught such things, the linchpin of the American Constitution is the Bill of Rights. Those were the rights the founding fathers of this great nation felt were necessary to spell out in the Constitution in order to safeguard us and our democracy from intrusive government. Thomas Jefferson and others would not ratify the document without the 10 Amendments that specified specific rights of citizens in order to limit for all time the power of the central government.

Some, like Alexander Hamilton, worried that actually specifying rights could be dangerous. In Federalist Paper No. 84, Hamilton wrote, “For why declare that things shall not be done which there is no power to do? Why, for instance, should it be said that the liberty of the press shall not be restrained, when no power is given by which restrictions may be imposed?” Today, living in a country without First Amendment rights—freedom of speech, assembly, religion, the press, and the right to petition the government for redress—would seem horrifying.

But that is the dangerous path we are on: Hamilton now seems naïve and Jefferson a visionary.

The executive branch has taken to picking and choosing which laws duly enacted by Congress will be enforced or ignored. Immigration and customs agents are directed not to enforce all immigration laws. The president has “evolved” in his opinion of homosexuality, so the Department of Justice will no longer defend the Defense of Marriage Act passed by Congress and signed by President Clinton.

When it comes to Planned Parenthood tax funding, we are told it would be better to shut down the government than cut one penny from the federal budget earmarked for Planned Parenthood. All this is done under a legislative maneuver called continuing resolutions since Congress has not actually fulfilled its constitutional duty and passed a budget in three years.

Paul Rondeau

Paul E. Rondeau is executive director of American Life League. Paul's 25 years of leadership experience includes serving as chief development officer, president, and executive director in higher education, pro-life, and pro-family organizations.

Paul has led coalitions in support of the successful confirmation of Chief Justice Roberts and Justice Alito; pro-life GOTV efforts for 14 U.S. Senate Races; and constitutional amendments at federal and state levels.

He has addressed audiences on three continents and made many appearances on broadcast, print, and new media addressing pro-life/pro-family topics. His research on communications strategies of radical social movements has been published in multiple languages and cited before the U.S. Supreme Court, the United Nations, and best-selling authors.

His latest work, co-author of "Global Sex Deviance Advocacy: The Trojan Horse to Destroy the Family and Civil Society: A report on UNESCO and International Planned Parenthood Federation," was published in the Ave Maria International Law Journal in the summer of 2012.

Prior to his work in the non-profit sector, Paul held senior international management positions with industry leaders such as Avis and Cast North America. Founder of Synapse Associates, he has consulted on Management, communications, and training with over 50 organizations in the private, education, and non-profit sectors. Paul holds an M.A. in management and communications, a B.A. in marketing management, and multiple professional certificates. He was appointed as adjunct faculty to teach management and communications at Southern New Hampshire University.

A Vietnam-era veteran originally from Michigan, Paul is a father of two children and now resides in North Virginia with his wife, Dr. Holiday Rondeau, professor and program director at the institute for Psychological Sciences.