Derek Hunter

I was a kid when breakdancing was a thing. Parachute pants, awful music and bad hair were all the rage for about 20 minutes in my pre-pubescent years. A staple of that horrible time in human history was the “break-fight.” A break-fight was a dance-off between two people or two groups of people because they lacked anything better to do. The winner, if you could call it that, won bragging rights for the 30 or so seconds the people who watched it took to turn away and forget the whole thing had happened. In the last week Democrats participated in a break-fight of sorts, but it was more of a “broke-fight,” and if any of them win, we all will lose.

It started with Hillary Clinton claiming she and Bill were “dead broke” when they left the White House. Diane Sawyer knew this was a lie. Everyone who heard it knew it was a lie. Hillary knew it was a lie when she said it, but she said it anyway because she was trying to convince middle income Americans that she “feels their pain.”

It was an obvious lie, but Hillary wants to be president herself, and her party just spent a billion dollars in 2012 demonizing a man who’d given away his entire trust fund and actually earned hundreds of millions of dollars on his own as being an out-of-touch elitist. Unlike Mitt Romney, who made decisions, founded companies and took risks to make his fortune, Bill and Hillary wrote books and gave speeches.

Knowing this, she doubled-down this week. She said, “but they don’t see me as part of the problem because we pay ordinary income tax, unlike a lot of people who are truly well off, not to name names…” Yes, she said having a net worth of between $100 and $200 million isn’t “truly well off.” I know Obama has been a disaster for the economy, but c’mon. She finished her statement with “…and we’ve done it through dint of hard work.”

The Clintons are the very definition of elites trading on their name to make their fortune. No jobs were created, no risks taken, and the only sweat broken was from the spotlight while they were on stage collecting millions of dollars for speaking. The only dirt they’ve had under their nails got there from counting money. If the risk of a paper cut from a $275,000 check for a speech is considered “hard work,” I completely misunderstood my time as a roofer in college.


Derek Hunter

Derek Hunter is Washington, DC based writer, radio host and political strategist. You can also stalk his thoughts 140 characters at a time on Twitter.