Debra J. Saunders
Mitt Romney came to stand on a weed-infested patch of dirt in front of the shuttered Solyndra plant in Fremont, Calif., Thursday. If you stood at the right angle, you could look past Romney's shoulder and see a big red "for sale" sign draped on the building, dubbed by Romney the "Taj Mahal of corporations."

Two years ago, President Barack Obama came to Solyndra under very different circumstances. The solar-power corporation was completing a second factory, which created about 3,000 temporary construction jobs and was expected to provide 1,000 permanent production jobs. Arnold Schwarzenegger, then the governor of California, was on the scene. The large crowd of hard hats and preening capitalists buzzed in the glow of presidential power.

"It's here that companies like Solyndra are leading the way toward a brighter and more prosperous future," said the president as he lauded such companies as "the true engine of economic growth." Robust words rolled off his tongue -- "ingenuity," "dynamism," "entrepreneurial spirit."

If you go to the White House's website, the president's May 26, 2010, speech is billed as "remarks on the economy." For some reason, Obamaland had chosen to showcase how the administration was boosting economic recovery by staging an event at a corporation that never had turned a profit and was building the new plant with the help of a $528 million federal loan.

A month after Obama came to Fremont, Solyndra canceled its $300 million public offering. The day after the November 2010 election, Solyndra announced it would shutter one of its plants. On Aug. 31, 2011, Solyndra closed shop and laid off most of its workers.

Secretary of Energy Steven Chu quietly restructured the deal to put private investors who plunked an extra $75 million into Solyndra ahead of taxpayers in the event of a bankruptcy. Because a big Obama donor was also a Solyndra investor and Chu approved the loan despite a warning from the Office of Management and Budget, Romney used the Fremont photo op to decry "crony capitalism."

The half-billion-dollar Solyndra deal did more than burn through taxpayer funds, Romney argued; it also sent a bad signal to investors and entrepreneurs that "the best way to get ahead is not with the best ideas and the best technology and the best people and the best marketing but instead with the best lobbyists."


Debra J. Saunders


 
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