Chuck Norris
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To commemorate Presidents Day and Washington's Birthday, last week I highlighted the first four of the top 10 reasons I wish George Washington were still alive:

10) Washington was a role model for many, even as a youth.

9) Washington epitomized courage.

8) Washington wasn't afraid of public opinion or challenging the status quo.

7) Washington was a man of integrity and character yet just as human as the rest of us.

Here are a few more of the reasons I wish Washington were still alive and why I believe the model of his life is still worthy to shadow today (These are also the reasons I cited in my New York Times best-seller "Black Belt Patriotism," which has an expanded paperback edition.)

6) Washington was a first-class servant leader who walked what he talked. He believed so firmly in our newly founded but poor republic that he took no pay for his service during the Revolutionary War (besides official expenses). And after eight long years of leading the war and retiring to his peaceful estate at Mount Vernon, he re-enlisted rather than stay retired. It is amazingly commendable -- if not astonishing -- that Washington came out of military retirement to serve two terms as president. He even had to borrow money to pay off debts and travel to his own inauguration.

5) Washington didn't allow personal obstacles to hinder his service to God, his country and his family. Among other sicknesses, according to Fox News, beginning at the age of 17, Washington suffered multiple malaria attacks throughout his life. He even had a case of smallpox and dysentery and struggled with depression and hearing loss.

In 1779, during the middle of the Revolutionary War, Washington "feared for his survival," not from bullets but from an abscess of the tonsils. And after all he had been through, at 57 years old, with his war-torn body and reportedly only a single real tooth in his mouth, Washington left behind the comfort of his estate on the edge of the Potomac River and traveled eight days to New York, where he was sworn in as president.

4) Washington was a devoted family man. In 1759, at 26 years of age, Washington married widow Martha Dandridge Custis. Though Martha and George had no children, he adopted her daughter and son from her former marriage. They also provided personal and financial support to nephews, nieces and other extended family members.

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Chuck Norris

Chuck Norris is a columnist and impossible to kill.