Women's March Leader: Don't Let People 'Be Comfortable Around You' If They Vote the Wrong Way

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Posted: Oct 04, 2018 4:35 PM
Women's March Leader: Don't Let People 'Be Comfortable Around You' If They Vote the Wrong Way

Tamika Mallory, co-chair of the Women’s March, told a group protesting Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court that “white women were laughing” when President Trump appeared to mock Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, the women accusing Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct. She also argued that the white women at the rally needed to go home and urge their families to vote differently, saying, “do not allow people to be comfortable around you supporting racists and bigots.”

“When he was mocking her there were people laughing,” she said of Trump’s rally. “There were people laughing and you know I’m the resident ‘check white women’ person in the Women’s March so let me tell you who was laughing: white women was standing there laughing with their white husbands.”

Dr. Christine Blasey Ford claims that Kavanaugh groped her and pinned her down while he was drunk at a party in high school in the 1980s.

"I had one beer and that's the only thing I remember," Trump said at a rally Tuesday, quoting Ford’s recollection of the night she claims she was sexually assaulted by Kavanaugh in what many perceived to be a mocking tone.

Mallory told white women that they “had work to do,” particularly when it comes to voting.

“White women were laughing so let me explain to you what I mean by that because I know those white women are not standing here with us today,” she said. “It means that 94 percent of black women went to the polls for Hillary Clinton, someone who looks like you. Your people did not show up. We got this. Black women are in control and we got this. We need you to go back home and get your cousins and your sisters and your mama and the people in your community. Don’t worry about telling us what we need to do, you have work to do ladies and gentlemen, get your people.”

Mallory concluded by telling those gathered to make people voting the “wrong” way uncomfortable.

As we go towards the midterm elections, if someone in your family even remotely seems like they may go the wrong way you need to be sure that you turn up on them at the dinner table,” she urged. “Do not allow people to be comfortable around you supporting racists and bigots, it is not okay.”

Tamika Mallory came under scrutiny in the spring for her ties to Louis Farrakhan, the anti-Semitic leader of the Nation of Islam.

Mallory responded to the criticism by doubling down on her attendance at “Saviour’s Day” where Farrakhan said Jews “were responsible for all of this filth and degenerate behavior that Hollywood is putting out, turning men into women and women into men."

Mallory had speaking engagements cancelled over her refusal to disavow Farrakhan, including one with Planned Parenthood.

The Women’s March tweeted a statement at the time that said Farrakhan’s statements at the event were not “aligned with their principles.”