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Tipsheet

House Democrats Prepare To Vote On A Subpoena For...

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

The House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday will vote on a resolution that would authorize subpoenas relating to Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report. If passed, the Committee would subpoena President Donald Trump's former Chief Strategist Steve Bannon, former Communications Director Hope Hicks, former White House Counsel Don McGahn, former Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, and McGhan's former Chief of Staff Ann Donaldson, the Daily Mail reported. 

The decision comes after House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-NY) and five other Democratic Committee Chairmen sent a letter to Attorney General William Barr formally requesting the full Mueller report.

"Each of our committees is currently engaged in oversight activities that go directly to the President's conduct, his attempts to interfere with federal and congressional investigations, his relations and communications with the Russian government and other foreign powers, and/or other alleged instances of misconduct," the letter reads. 

According to the Committee Chairmen, Barr's summary is "not sufficient for Congress, as a coequal branch of government, to perform this critical work."

Barr told the House Judiciary Committee on Friday that he was actively working to provide a full redacted report to Congress. He expected the report to be ready in mid-April, although it could come earlier.

But a redacted version is far from what Congress wants.

"We — the members of the Judiciary Committee, the House of Representatives and the entire American public — are still waiting to see that report. We will not wait much longer," Chairman Nadler said in an opinion piece in the New York Times. "We have an obligation to read the full report, and the Department of Justice has an obligation to provide it, in its entirely, without delay. If the department is unwilling to produce the full report voluntarily, then we will do everything in our power to secure it for ourselves."

Nadler explains why Democrats continually push for the full Mueller report to be released:

The entire reason for appointing the special counsel was to protect the investigation from political influence. By offering us his version of events in lieu of the report, the attorney general, a recent political appointee, undermines the work and the integrity of his department. He also denies the public the transparency it deserves. We require the full report — the special counsel’s words, not the attorney general’s summary or a redacted version.

We require the report, first, because Congress, not the attorney general, has a duty under the Constitution to determine whether wrongdoing has occurred. The special counsel declined to make a “traditional prosecutorial judgment” on the question of obstruction, but it is not the attorney general’s job to step in and substitute his judgment for the special counsel’s.

That responsibility falls to Congress — and specifically to the House Judiciary Committee — as it has in every similar investigation in modern history. The attorney general’s recent proposal to redact the special counsel’s report before we receive it is unprecedented. We require the evidence, not whatever remains after the report has been filtered by the president’s political appointee.

There have been bi-partisan calls for a full release of the Mueller report. President Trump has also supported the report's full release.

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