Joe Biden's Chaotic Israel Position Isn't an Accident. It's Primed for Something Sinister.
Saudi Arabia Publicly Acknowledges It Helped Defend Israel This Weekend
Why Trump Went Off on the Judge Presiding Over His Hush Money Trial
Water Is Wet, NPR Is Liberal And Other Obvious Things
We Dare Not Tempt Them With Weakness
Communists Betray Workers, Teachers Unions Betray Students, Civil Rights Organizations Bet...
The Politics of Steel Are Center Stage in Pennsylvania
A Taxing Time
Joe Biden on the Economy: I Don't Feel Your Pain
America No More…
Uniting Against Tech Oligarchy: The Sale of TikTok and the Open App Markets...
Democrats Should Join the Call for FDA to Accelerate Approval of Smokefree Products
'Apple Doesn’t Fall Far From the Tree': Chairman Comer Reacts to Biden's Refusal...
Senate Republicans Once Again Demand Standalone Aid for Israel
FISA Extension Now Heads to the Senate
OPINION

The Glum and the Restless

The opinions expressed by columnists are their own and do not necessarily represent the views of Townhall.com.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Here’s a fact that should give economists—and maybe President Obama’s political team—heartburn: Two years after the Great Recession officially ended, job prospects for young Americans remain historically grim. More than 17 percent of 16-to-24-year-olds who are looking for work can’t find a job, a rate that is close to a 30-year high. The employment-to-population ratio for that demographic—the percentage of young people who are working—has plunged to 45 percent. That’s the lowest level since the Labor Department began tracking the data in 1948. Taken together, the numbers suggest that the U.S. job market is struggling mightily to bring its next generation of workers into the fold.
Advertisement

This is a dangerous proposition, economically (for the United States as a whole) and politically (for the president).

Join the conversation as a VIP Member

Recommended

Trending on Townhall Videos