Sarah Jean Seman

A man delivering a pizza late at night in upstate New York looks like an easy target for a robber — and he probably is without a gun. The good news is, the pizza delivery man attacked by four armed robbers outside a house in Buffalo Monday did not go to work that day unarmed.

The Buffalo News reported:

A gang of robbers attacked a pizza deliveryman just before 10:30 p.m. Monday as he brought food to a house in the 400 block of Cornwall Avenue, near Erie County Medical Center.

In the front hallway of the house, one of the robbers, who wore a mask and had a brown hoodie pulled over his face, hit the deliveryman on the head with a hammer, according to police.

The masked man also displayed what appeared to be a gun, police said.

But then, the deliveryman told investigators, he pulled out his own handgun and fired a shot, striking the masked man. The rest of the gang scattered.

The pizza delivery man suffered from wounds to the head and bruises on his left hand. The masked man, 18-year-old DeJuan Coleman, is under police guard while he recovers from the gun shot wound. He will face charges of first-degree robbery.

New York is hardly the friendliest state for gun owners. On Tuesday residents protested Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s (D-NY) anti-gun legislation by tearing SAFE Act registration cards to pieces, and they are not the only ones disgruntled. A rising number of Americans support fewer gun laws, a January Gallup poll revealed:

Gun-control advocates often use tragedies to push anti-gun legislation. However, the poll above, conducted after the December 2012 Sandy Hook school shooting, shows that even fewer Americans supported gun-control in the aftermath of the tragic event.

The gap between those wanting stricter gun laws and those wanting less strict laws narrowed as a result of a sharp increase in the percentage of Americans who want less strict laws, now at 16% up from 5% a year ago. Support for making gun laws stricter fell to 31% from 38% last January. The January 2013 poll was conducted shortly after the December 2012 Sandy Hook school shooting tragedy, which sparked some state governments to consider new gun laws and a robust national discussion about the issue.

Since politicians continue to use heart-wrenching events to promote their political agendas, it's important that these everyday stories of citizens protecting themselves through their Second Amendment rights are told.


Sarah Jean Seman

Sarah Jean Seman is a Townhall Web Editor. Follow Sarah Jean Seman on Twitter @sarah_jean_

Author Photo credit: Jensen Sutta Photography