Leah Barkoukis

The notorious serial killer, cannibal, and necrophiliac Jeffrey Dahmer is known for raping, torturing, and dismembering his victims, the first of whom was a hitchhiker by the name of Steven Hicks. Dahmer brought Hicks to his parents’ home in Bath, Ohio, in 1978, where he proceeded to kill him with a blow to the head with a barbell. To get rid of the body, Dahmer cut it up, wrapped it up in garbage bags, and buried them in the woods behind his parents’ house. After a few years, Dahmer returned to the site, dug up the body, and “pounded the decomposing corpse with a sledgehammer and scattered the remains in the woods.”

PETA thinks this house, with its sordid history, is just the perfect location to open up a vegan restaurant named “Eat for Life—Home Cooking.” Yes, seriously—it’s up for sale, and they want to buy it.

“We’re always looking for ways to turn cruelty on its ugly head, so when we heard that serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer‘s childhood home had been put up for sale, we saw an opportunity to create good out of evil. Rather than remaining as a stark reminder of its dark past, the building can instead become the site of a celebration of culinary compassion,” PETA writes on its blog.

It gets better:

“Like Dahmer’s human victims, cows, pigs, and chickens are made of flesh and blood and fear for their lives when confronted by a man with a knife. They are also drugged and dragged, and their limbs are bound. Their struggles and screams are ignored as they are killed and cut up to be consumed. Their bones are thrown away like garbage.”

Is this just PETA actively looking for publicity? Maybe. But if they truly believe it’s OK to compare human victims of horrific murders to that of a pig’s death, there’s no rationalizing with them and it’s clear they have zero respect for human life. Heck, these are the same people that have compared the death of six billion broiler chickens in slaughterhouses to the death of six million Jews in concentration camps.

I highly doubt their dream for the house will come to fruition but if it does, rest assured, ‘Eat for Life’ will celebrate a grand opening and grand closing in the same week.


Leah Barkoukis

Leah Barkoukis is the online features editor and web editor at Townhall.com.

Author Photo credit: Jensen Sutta Photography

Due to the overwhelming enthusiasm of our readers it has become necessary to transfer our commenting system to a more scalable system in order handle the content.