Star Parker

The Book of Proverbs, part of biblical canon, once a vital part of American culture, tells us: “Pride goes before destruction, a haughty spirit before a fall.”

It’s this haughty spirit, this pride that precedes destruction, that lies behind the Supreme Court’s decision last week to bury the Defense of Marriage Act.

DOMA defined marriage, for purposes of federal law, as traditional marriage – the union of man and woman.

This decision did not come out of nowhere. It did not happen in a vacuum. It is but the latest in a long process of the unraveling of American culture driven by pride – the sense that we answer to no higher authority. That the two-legged animal man is master of the universe and decides, invents right and wrong, true and false.

There have been many stops on the way to this Supreme Court decision relegating marriage, as we have known and understood it for millennia, to a casual fiction that could come out of Hollywood.

One stop we might note was the Supreme Court’s decision in 1980, Stone v Graham, that said that posting the Ten Commandments in a public school is unconstitutional.

A free society must start with a foundation of rules. If our biblical tradition is not the source of these rules, what rules do define how we live and where do these rules come from?

The preamble of our Constitution tells us that its purpose is to secure the “blessings of liberty.”

What is a blessing? The first definition in my Webster’s New World Dictionary says that a blessing is “a statement of divine favor”.

How can we secure divine favor in a nation for which the divine is unconstitutional? A prideful nation by definition must be a nation that rejects the idea of a blessing.

In the pride that precedes destruction in America of 2013, we reject that there are truths that don’t come out of a laboratory. We reject that that there are truths that parents get from their parents and pass on to their children.

We reject that there are truths that, when children learn them from their parents, and embrace them and become responsible for them, they become adults.

So now we live in society in which there is nothing that distinguishes a child from an adult, that distinguishes responsible from irresponsible.

Who suffers the most?

First and foremost, children. Because they are deprived from learning and taking seriously the very rules of life’s road that are critical to live successfully.

Even more so, children from minority families.


Star Parker

Star Parker is founder and president of CURE, the Center for Urban Renewal and Education, a 501c3 think tank which explores and promotes market based public policy to fight poverty, as well as author of the newly revised Uncle Sam's Plantation: How Big Government Enslaves America's Poor and What We Can do About It.