Phyllis Schlafly

Ever since former first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton proclaimed that she and her husband were the victims of a "vast right-wing conspiracy," "conspiracy" has been the hot word used to ridicule your opponents.

When President George W. Bush wanted to avoid answering questions about whether the Security and Prosperity Partnership is the prelude to a North American Union connected by a three-country superhighway, he accused SPP critics of believing in a conspiracy.

By definition, conspiracies are usually secret. There's nothing secret about right-wingers organizing to criticize the Clintons and their goals, and there's nothing secret about plans to morph the United States into a North American Union.

The elites, however, must be feeling the heat. Following the Hudson Institute's helpful suggestion to change the name of the Security and Prosperity Partnership, the fourth annual SPP meeting to be held in New Orleans on April 21 will now be called the North American Leaders Summit, and the promoters of the TransTexas Corridor are trying to change its name to "regional loop."

To see what the elites are planning, you don't have peek through keyholes or plant a spy under the table. Just read their published reports.

The words most frequently used to describe their goals are "economic integration," "labor mobility," "free movement of goods, services and people across open borders," and "harmonization" of regulations.

The Council on Foreign Relations published a major report May 17, 2005, only two months after the Security and Prosperity Partnership was announced by President Bush, then-Mexican President Vicente Fox, and Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin in Waco, Texas, on March 23, 2005. The Council on Foreign Relations document explaining SPP's goals and methodology was posted on the U.S. State Department Web site, thereby confirming its authenticity.

The report explains that the three SPP amigos at Waco "committed their governments" to "Building a North American Community" by 2010 with a common "outer security perimeter," "the extension of full labor mobility to Mexico," allowing Mexican trucks "unlimited access," "totalization" of illegal immigrants into the U.S. Social Security system, and "a permanent tribunal for North American dispute resolution."

The prestigious Center for Strategic & International Studies published a report in 2007 called "North American Future 2025 Project." It advocates "economic integration," the "free flow of people across national borders," and "policies that integrate governments."


Phyllis Schlafly

Phyllis Schlafly is a national leader of the pro-family movement, a nationally syndicated columnist and author of Feminist Fantasies.
 
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