Obama Soul

John McCaslin
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Posted: Jun 02, 2008 10:16 AM
Obama Soul

The elderly passenger riding aboard the Metro from Washington into Virginia glued this message to the brim of her canvas hat: "Old White Woman for Obama."

This gal's for you

Headlines blared that Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton was dealt a substantial blow when Democratic Party leaders late Saturday agreed to seat Michigan and Florida delegates with half-votes at this summer's convention.

In response, the ever-stubborn Clinton campaign vowed to carry its uphill fight for the White House all the way to the August convention. Which comes as no surprise, of course.

A few weeks ago, Mrs. Clinton announced Project T-Shirt, in which she invited supporters to submit designs for her official campaign T-shirt to carry her into the final stretch. Thousands of entries were submitted, which have now been narrowed to five, including a silhouette of the pant-suited candidate and these words: "For everyone who's ever been counted out but refused to be knocked out and for everyone who works hard and never gives up, this one is for you!"

Mind your manners

Posted by an event organizer yesterday on Sen. Barack Obama's official Web site:

"It's that time again to speak out. Do you think Sen. [Hillary Rodham] Clinton's campaign tactics and rogue comments on DNC policy are unacceptably divisive? Take a minute to email/call DNC Chair Gov. Howard Dean now and tell him why he needs to step in [and] rebuke Sen. Clinton and mandate ethical conduct for this campaign.

"Please be respectful and illustrate what it means to be ethical. No cursing or slander, please. Remember we are representing a movement of Hope."

One man's fool

It was Mark Twain who said, "It is better to keep your mouth closed and let people think you are a fool than to open it and remove all doubt."

That said, while addressing Virginia's Republican Party convention in Richmond over the weekend, Vice President Dick Cheney recalled that he served in the House for more than a decade representing Wyoming, a state with only one congressman.

"After being elected five times, I assumed I was pretty well-known throughout the state," he said. "During my last campaign for Congress, I always remember campaigning in a little farming community at Torrington down along the Wyoming-Nebraska border. I walked to one old cowboy leaning with his back up against a tree and cowboy hat pulled down over his eyes. I reached out and grabbed him by the hand and said:

"'Hi, I'm Dick Cheney. I'm running for Congress, and I'd like your vote.' He said, 'You got it. That fool we got in there now is no damn good.'"

Close call

Barbara Grassley, wife of longtime Iowa Republican Sen. Charles E. Grassley, tells a Washington-area friend that the F-3 tornado that killed six people in Iowa last week, destroying hundreds of structures, almost hit home.

The Grassleys' farmhouse was just a mile from the deadly destruction, she said.

GOP veep

R.M. Bragg of Alexandria writes: "I read with interest your Inside the Beltway item regarding New York Rep. Pete King as a possible Republican vice presidential pick. He'd certainly be a good choice, but there might be an even better option for Sen. John McCain.

"He could announce that he was not going to hand-pick the vice-presidential nominee, but was going to allow that decision to be made by the convention. At one stroke, this would re-energize Republican voters and revive media interest in the party's future, thus diluting the constant attention given to the Democratic contest.

"It would play well with both those who admire his 'maverick' image, because it would be bold and unexpected, the very antithesis of 'the old politics.' Paradoxically, it would also appeal to GOP loyalists who don't care for his perceived lack of adherence to the party's expectations, because the convention does represent the party.

"In essence, he would be giving the party itself the right to select the GOP nominee - a move that could only be seen as a decision to trust the party's judgment on an important issue. It would almost certainly considerably increase the number of folks who would watch the convention on TV. Should the Democratic nominee be chosen by superdelegates, as seems likely to be the case, it would offer a stark contrast in terms of which party actually appears to listen to its rank-and-file and which appears to be run by insider polls ...

"I doubt that any choice that Senator McCain could make would give the party as much of a boost as making the decision to leave the choice to the convention. Risky? Maybe, but certainly interesting."