Dennis Prager

A few days after this column appears, I will be visiting my 100th country -- Cambodia. I am writing this column aboard a ship on the South China Sea on my way there along with 200 of my radio listeners.

I consider this a major milestone. For one thing, I admit to being proud of it. It is not easy to visit a hundred countries (most of them at least twice); it takes far more commitment than it does money. But the reasons I consider this a major milestone are not primarily because it is an achievement.

It is major because all this travel has been life-changing and life-enhancing. For many years, I have urged young people to take a year off after high school to work and to take time off while in college to travel abroad, ideally alone for at least some of the time.

Nearly everyone grows up insular. The problem is that vast numbers of people never leave the cloistered world of their childhood. This is as true for those who grow up in Manhattan as those who grow up in Fargo or Tokyo. And as for college, there are few places as insular and cloistered as the university.

Insularity is bad because at the very least, it prevents questioning oneself and thinking through important ideas and convictions. And at worst, it facilitates the groupthink that allows for most great evils. Though one can hold on to insular and bad ideas even after interacting with others, it is much harder to do so, especially when one interacts on the others' terms, as must be done when traveling to other cultures (and especially when travelling alone).

It is therefore one of the most maturing things a person can do. It is also one of the most humbling. I will never forget the effect of hosting a weekly radio show in which I was the moderator among clergy of every religion. After five years, I announced this conclusion: "The moment you meet people of other faiths whom you consider to be at least as decent, as least as religious and at least as intelligent as you think you are, you will never be the same."

This is not to suggest that the inevitable consequence of international travel is multicultural relativism -- the belief that every culture is equal, that no culture is morally or culturally superior. On the contrary, my going abroad every year for 42 years has strengthened my appreciation of both Western culture and America's unique value system (what I call the American Trinity: Liberty, In God We Trust and E Pluribus Unum).

But there is one benefit to international travel that probably cannot be gained in any other way: Other nations and other peoples become real.


Dennis Prager

Dennis Prager is a SRN radio show host, contributing columnist for Townhall.com and author of his newest book, Still the Best Hope: Why the World Needs American Values to Triumph.
 
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