Ben Shapiro
This week, writer-director Nick Cassavetes released his new movie, "Yellow," about a woman having an affair with her brother. "I have no experience with incest," says Cassavetes. "We started thinking about that. We had heard a few stories where brothers and sisters were completely, absolutely in love with one another. You know what? This whole movie is about judgment, and lack of it, and doing what you want."

But Cassavetes wasn't done: "Who gives a s--- if people judge you? I'm not saying this is an absolute, but in a way, if you're not having kids, who gives a damn? Love who you want. Isn't that what we say? Gay marriage -- love who you want? If it's your brother or sister, it's super weird, but if you look at it, you're not hurting anybody except every single person who freaks out because you're in love with one another."

Here's the thing: Cassavetes is exactly correct.

There are those who say that gay marriage is a slippery slope toward incest. It isn't. The gay marriage and incest lie are justified by precisely the same moral argument: the argument that love defines an acceptable relationship. Sexual urges are, according to the left, their own moral justification -- what is biological is justifiable. If gays and lesbians are "born this way," why not incestuous duos? If consent is the highest value and two siblings consent, what's the problem?

This is an unanswerable argument for the left. It's why they resort to total emotion when asked about the logical distinction between gay marriage and incest. They get offended. They shout about how awful any such comparison is. But they never offer a single rational argument.

In fact, when given the opportunity, the left sidles up to taboo sexual relationships regularly. Nicole Kidman starred in "Birth," in which she gets naked with a ten-year-old who is supposedly her reincarnated husband. In "The Graduate," Dustin Hoffman stars as an annoying newly graduated college student who makes it with both mother and daughter. And it's not just on film. Roman Polanski, according to Whoopi Goldberg, never engaged in "rape rape" after he raped a teenage girl. Jason Biggs, star of "American Pie," enjoys tweeting about the anuses of prominent Republican politicians, and then he hires prostitutes with his wife, Jenny Mollen, star of "Crazy, Stupid, Love."

Hollywood has a high tolerance point for perversion. That's why it would be silly to see Cassavetes' stance as anything but the point of the liberal spear. After all, if two consenting siblings want to have sex in the privacy of their home, who are you to object? How does their love affect your relationship? And if Hollywood wants to show it onscreen, what power do you have to try to stop them?


Ben Shapiro

Ben Shapiro is an attorney, a writer and a Shillman Journalism Fellow at the Freedom Center. He is editor-at-large of Breitbart and author of the best-selling book "Primetime Propaganda: The True Hollywood Story of How the Left Took Over Your TV."
 
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