Ann Coulter

When I wrote a book about mobs and group-think a few years ago, I could honestly say that mob behavior existed exclusively on the left in America -- unless you count Oakland Raiders tailgate parties, which I do not. As described in Demonic: How the Liberal Mob Is Endangering America, the distinctive characteristics of the mob mentality include:

-- Slogans as arguments ("Bush lied, kids died!" "Keep your laws off my body!" "You can't hug a child with nuclear arms");

-- Imperviousness to facts (e.g., the left's refusal to abandon repeatedly disproved canards about Reagan's tax cuts causing the deficit, the Aug. 6th PDB (President's Daily Brief) stating anything relevant about 9/11, and Valerie Plame being an "undercover agent");

-- Acceptance of contradictions (I haven't heard a cavil from MSNBC about Obama's expansion of the Afghanistan war, use of drones and continued operation of Guantanamo -- all deemed "war crimes" in the Bush administration); and

-- Extreme emotional attachment to their leaders combined with a passionate hatred of putative enemies (the burning and decapitations of Bush in effigy, books and movies about Bush's assassination -- even as liberals' publicly discuss their sex fantasies about Clinton and Obama).

To my dismay, some of these mob characteristics can now be found in small pockets on the right.

For months and months, for example, I've been demanding facts -- not shibboleths or epithets -- from the anti-Mitch McConnell brigade.

Here are my facts:

(1) For more than a decade, Sen. Mitch McConnell has stood alone in fighting unconstitutional campaign finance laws, earning him the undying enmity of The New York Times. (The Times is probably the largest contributor to the Senate Conservatives Fund opposing McConnell.)

McConnell took on the entire MSM, as well as members of his own party, principally John McCain and President Bush, who incomprehensibly signed McCain-Feingold into law with the idle musing that the Supreme Court could strike down any unconstitutional parts. (It didn't -- until some of it was finally overturned in Citizens United.)

McConnell was the Ted Cruz of campaign finance laws, leading filibusters to block these outrageous infringements on free speech, writing op-eds and giving speeches denouncing them, and directly suing to have McCain-Feingold declared unconstitutional in McConnell v. FEC.

As McConnell explained (beautifully):