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Tipsheet

Senator Blows Through Biden's 'Soul of the Nation' Slogan With Facts About the Border Crisis

Senate Republicans held a press conference Tuesday to detail the horrors of President Joe Biden's open border policies, which the White House continues to claim are "orderly and humane."

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Alabama's Freshman Senator Katie Britt didn't hold back and talked about the women she met during a recent visit to the U.S. southern border. 

Republicans are in a spending fight with Democrats as a government shut down looms. With no end in sight for the flow of illegal immigrants into the country, House and Senate members are vowing to find a way to secure the border. 

Meanwhile, the New York Times is exposing an underground labor market made up of illegal immigrant minors in American factories. They work night shifts in dangerous conditions to pay their human smuggling debts to Mexican drug cartels. 

The belt caught the sleeve of Marcos’s baggy jacket and pulled him across the floor. Hard plastic teeth ripped through his muscles, tearing open his forearm down to the bone. By the time someone heard his screams and shut off the power, his arm was limp, a deep triangular gash running down the length of it. A rope of white tendons hung from his elbow to his wrist, horrifying the workers who gathered around him. He understood from their faces that something was badly wrong but didn’t feel any pain as the wound began gushing blood and he started to lose consciousness.

The morning after Marcos’s injury, workers in Dreamland began talking about a child whose arm had been nearly torn off at the plant. Word soon spread through town. There were reasons that supervisors, teachers, federal inspectors and even police officers had said nothing for years about children working at the slaughterhouses. Everyone understood that the children were under extraordinary pressure to earn money to pay off their travel debts and help their families back home.

Marcos woke up alone in a hospital room in a tangle of intravenous tubing and beeping machines. He knew that children were not supposed to work at the plant, and now he understood why. But he worried about what his parents would do if he didn’t recover — they still owed more than $6,000 for his journey north. He believed he had to get better and persuade the bosses to hire him back.

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