Guy Benson

The Party Of Ideas likes to remind us that they're the adults in the room; the only thing standing between civilization and the knuckle-dragging barbarians across the aisle.  It's their calm, civil, and empathetic approach that will pull the nation through its darkest hours, if only they can succeed in beating back the savage designs of their violent, impulsive opponents.  That's why we should be forever grateful for leaders like DNC chairman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, whose commitment to constructive dialogue is matched only by her passion for history:
 

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.), chair of the Democratic National Committee, said Wednesday that House Republicans are trying to impose “dictatorship” through their tactics in the debt-ceiling negotiations. She said the GOP rhetoric could “spark panic and chaos,” which she called “potentially devastating” to the economy.

“Aren’t we at the point where the closer we get to chaos, the more concern that there should be about coming to the table and compromising with Democrats?” Wasserman Schultz asked. “This is not leadership. This is almost like dictatorship. I know they want to force the outcome that … their extremists would like to impose. But they are getting ready to spark panic and chaos, and they seem to be OK with that. And it’s just really disappointing, and potentially devastating.”

Specifically, Wasserman Schultz cited a movie clip House Republican Whip Kevin McCarthy (Calif.) had played Tuesday during a closed-door meeting of the House Republican Conference. The brief clip was from “The Town,” and Republicans said it was intended to send the message that “we’re all in this together.”  The DNC chair said: “They start the day with trying to incite their caucus with, essentially, violent movie clips – pushing their people to inflict pain and hurt people.


Remind us, Debbie, whose rhetoric is designed to "spark panic and chaos"?  In her defense, DWS is only following the template established by her party's top brass.  Harry Reid has uncorked a few ridiculous comments over the last week, each one notable for its hyperbole and hypocrisy.  And since Little Debbie was so horribly alarmed by Kevin McCarthy's use of a video clip from a "violent movie" to rally his caucus, I presume she's outright terrified by Steny Hoyer's gunfire analogies:
 


 

Back at the White House, Press Secretary Jay Carney is busy redefining "leadership," ducking and dismissing legitimate questions, and insulting reporters.  His latest target was Ed Henry, who literally jumped to Fox News from CNN this week.  Now when Henry asks a tough question, it's not because he's a journalist seeking the truth; it's because he's "creating a thing for Fox." (Eloquently stated, Mr. Carney): 
 


 

These aren't marginal figures, mind you.  These are the Democratic Party chairwoman, the leader of the US Senate, the House Minority Whip, and the chief White House spokesman.  It's at times like this that the words we're screwed start cropping up in my mind.  But lo, a titan of truth weighs in, and inspires us to fight another day:
 

"You can't lead from behind."


You know who probably liked that clip?  Mitt Romney.


UPDATE - Evidently, Pelosi saw this post and felt a little neglected.  You cannot make this stuff up:


Pelosi: What we're trying to do is save the world from the Republican budget. We're trying to save life on this planet as we know it today.


Guy Benson

Guy Benson is Townhall.com's Senior Political Editor. Follow him on Twitter @guypbenson.

Author Photo credit: Jensen Sutta Photography