Elisabeth Meinecke

After a 40-year test, country after country is giving the policy of multiculturalism a failing grade. Can the United States learn from other nations' mistakes?

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From Townhall Magazine's EXCLUSIVE October feature "How Multiculturalism Failed Europe":

Politicians from Paris to Perth have proclaimed their nations' 'multicultural' immigration policies to be "a failure" as newspaper headlines detail violence, isolation, poverty and rising welfare costs in their countries.

British Prime Minister David Cameron and French President Nicolas Sarkozy recently urged their nations to abandon the multicultural model that encourages immigrants to continue cultivating their native identites in countries where they're often at odds with long-standing ideological foundations.

"We worry too much about the identities of those who've arrived here, rather than about the identity of the very country taking them in," Sarkozy proclaimed.

German newspapers detail so-called "No Go areas" and the French government has identified "sensitive urban zones," immigrant neighborhoods not considered safe for whites and non-Muslims. The German newspaper Bild reports that even police fear responding to calls in No Go areas, citing a 60-percent increase in violent assaults against against officers there between 2005 and 2009. ...

Multiculturalism--sometime called cultural Marxism--is credited with creating tragedy on both sides.

In her 2010 public repudiation of multiculturalism, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said sacrificing the German national identity in favor of promoting cultural separatism has fomented an environment for "extremist politics" where young people who feel no attachment to their new homeland can become homegrown terrorists.

The door has also swung the other direction.

Anders Behring Breivik put a tragic face on the debate in July when the 32-year-old Norwegian went on a bombing-and-bullets spree that killed 76 people at an Oslo government center and a summer camp for politically connected youth.

Read more of Kathy Jessup's report in the October issue of Townhall Magazine, including:

  • -- a better understanding of what multiculturalism is
  • -- implications for the United States
  • -- how it's changing Europe

Order Townhall Magazine today to get the full report in the October issue.

 

 


Elisabeth Meinecke

Elisabeth Meinecke is TOWNHALL MAGAZINE Managing Editor. Follow her on Twitter @lismeinecke.