Colorado in focus: Pueblo County voters will be asked to increase their sales tax in an effort to build a new jail, detox center

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Posted: Sep 08, 2017 11:08 AM

Denver Post: Pueblo County voters will be asked to increase their sales tax in an effort to build a new jail, detox center

Pueblo County voters will be asked in November to increase their sales tax rate as part of efforts that could cost up to $150 million to battle jail overcrowding and get a handle on the local explosion of opioid abuse that officials are battling.

County commissioners on Wednesday approved a ballot question for the coming election asking that the county-wide sales tax be increased by nine-twentieths of a cent — or 45 percent of a penny — for the next 30 years starting in January.

That would generate an estimated $10.59 million of new annual revenue starting next year.County commissioners on Wednesday approved a ballot question for the coming election asking that the county-wide sales tax be increased by nine-twentieths of a cent — or 45 percent of a penny — for the next 30 years starting in January.

The money would pay for a new county jail and a rehabilitation and transformation of the current detention center into a state-of-the-art detoxification and health facility with a focus on opioid addiction.

The Gazette: Colorado governor makes case for HickCare on Capitol Hill

Gov. John Hickenlooper advocated a bipartisan revision to the nation’s health insurance program during a U.S. Senate hearing Thursday.

“Many people are angry, and they have a right to be,” the Democratic governor testified.

He developed the plan with six governors from both parties as the time to revise the Obama administration’s Affordable Care Act is running out this year.

Communique: University of Colorado economic impact: $12.35 billion

UCCS contributed more than $593 million to the local and statewide economies last year, part of a $12.35 billion contribution by all University of Colorado campuses.

The figures headlined a new economic impact study completed by the Business Research Division of the CU Boulder Leeds School of Business. Based on data from the 2015-16 fiscal year, the report was delivered Sept. 7 to the CU Board of Regents.

“The study demonstrates what we have long known – the University of Colorado is a substantial driver of Colorado’s economy,” said CU President Bruce D. Benson. “We’re proud of the many contributions we make to our state and its quality of life and we intend to continue our efforts to advance Colorado.”

The CU system and its four campuses  directly employed 32,386 faculty, staff and student workers in FY2016, making CU the third-largest employer in the state of Colorado.