Coup? Venezuelan Supreme Court Strips Power From The Legislature

Matt Vespa
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Posted: Apr 01, 2017 9:00 PM
Coup? Venezuelan Supreme Court Strips Power From The Legislature

With 21st Century Socialism continuing to plague the country, Venezuela’s Supreme Curt decided that the legislature, which is controlled by parties opposed President Nicolas Maduro, is in contempt and that they would—you know—take over that end of government business. This pretty much dissolves the legislature. The Court is, of course, packed with allies of Maduro, who is the late Hugo Chavez left wing successor (via WSJ):

“This ruling marks the point of no return for the dictatorship,” National Assembly Vice President Freddy Guevara said. Assembly President Julio Borges called the act a coup and urged Venezuelans to rally on Saturday to defend the country’s democracy.

The Supreme Court, which is packed with allies of President Nicolás Maduro, ruled late Wednesday that the congress was in contempt of court for having sworn in three lawmakers from the remote Amazonas state whom the ruling party had accused of electoral fraud. The court said it takes over all “parliamentary capacities” until the conflict is resolved.

[…]

Maduro now has all powers in his hands, without any checks and balances,” Mr. Borges said. “This is the action of a desperate man who knows the whole world is turning against him.”

Several opposition lawmakers who tried to enter the Supreme Court building Thursday afternoon were blocked by soldiers in riot gear and manhandled by government supporters shouting “get out.”

[…]

Venezuela’s opposition won overwhelming control of the assembly in December 2015, in a victory it called the first step toward ending almost two decades of rule by a far-left movement created by the late Hugo Chávez.

[…]

To many Venezuelans, the ruling is the final nail to the fading hopes that swept the country after the congressional elections that the government could be changed and the economy stabilized.

Since last year, elections have been stalled and political opposition leaders jailed. The WSJ added that the Venezuelan Supreme Court stripped assembly members of immunity and ordered those who had put forward policies that went against the agent of President Maduro to be charged with treason in secret courts. That’s right—these people are the problem, not the horrific economic policies that have forced citizens, including soldiers, to eat out of garbage cans because there’s a food shortage. Venezuelans have resorted to looting and the consumption of zoo and domestic animals for food. Toilet paper is now a rare commodity and the medical system has all but collapsed. Yet, the opposition parties are the problem. Can we officially call Venezuela a full-blown dictatorship yet?