MSM: Yeah, Hillary Seems to Have Lied A Lot in That CNN Interview

Guy Benson
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Posted: Jul 09, 2015 12:30 PM
MSM: Yeah, Hillary Seems to Have Lied A Lot in That CNN Interview

You already knew this, of course -- for reasons Katie and I have been spelling out in great detail. But it's useful to note that mainstream media organizations are also taking Mrs. Clinton to task for a serving up a string of falsehoods in her first national media interview of a three-month-old campaign.  Fittingly, this was the same sit-down in which Clinton insisted that Americans "should and do" trust her.  CNN blew up Hillary's claim that she was never subpoenaed, dispatching a correspondent to Trey Gowdy's office for proof:


Gowdy then appeared on the Hugh Hewitt Show last night and responded to Hillary's assertions in-depth:


"It is a fact that there was a subpoena issued to her in March of 2015…it's also a fact that there was a subpoena in existence from another Congressional committee far before that one. So there are two subpoenas, there are letters from Congress, and there's a statutory obligation to her to preserve public records. So whether it's a subpoena in place, or whether it's a statute in place, or whether it's a Congressional investigation in place, you can't delete and wipe out public records… [Her statement] is false. I can prove that it’s false, and I can prove that [she] should have known it was false at the time. What I cannot do is climb into someone’s head. I just can’t do it. But for my purposes, it is enough that I know it was false, it was false at the time you said it, and I can make a pretty good circumstantial case that you should have known it was false.

The Wall Street Journal tackled the subpoena lie, too, but also called out a number of off additional factually-inaccurate statements Hillary continues to advance.  A few portions of the Journal's fact check:

1.) “Everything I did was permitted. There was no law. There was no regulation. There was nothing that did not give me the full authority to decide how I was going to communicate.”
...The practice did, however, contravene the State Department’s recommendations and guidelines. Guidance published in the State Department’s foreign affairs manual call for employees to use secure, department-approved computer systems — even for unclassified information. And a 2011 diplomatic cable issued in Mrs. Clinton’s name instructs employees to avoid using their personal emails for government business.

3.) “I didn’t have to turn over anything. I chose to turn over 55,000 pages because I wanted to go above and beyond what was expected of me...And I had no obligation to do any of that. So let’s set the record straight.”

As a public servant, Mrs. Clinton had a duty to ensure that all her work records were in government custody. In 2009, the National Archives said agencies and departments that allowed employees to use private email accounts had to make sure they were preserved “in the appropriate agency recordkeeping system.” Experts on federal records laws say that that requirement extended to her. “When you listen to the CNN interview, she apparently remains under the impression that she went above and beyond any legal requirements and that there were no requirements as a matter of law or fact to make an issue out in terms of her failure to turn over email records relating to government business on a more timely basis,” said Jason R. Baron, a lawyer at Drinker Biddle and former director of litigation for the National Archives and Records Administration. “That’s clearly not correct.

5.) “I turned over everything that I could imagine.”

The State Department acknowledged last month that Mrs. Clinton didn’t turn over at least 15 emails that appeared to be work-related. They were instead uncovered as part of a Benghazi committee subpoena to a family friend. Mrs. Clinton said that she wiped her personal server clean after turning over her email records.

I'll leave you with the Free Beacon's round-up of media scorn over Clinton's showing: