Sanders Urges DNC to Be More Transparent
Cortney O'Brien  | November 10, 2017

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), the purported victim of the DNC's rigged 2016 primary, has jotted down some thoughts on the Donna Brazile bombshell in a new op-ed. 

Brazile, the former acting DNC chair, released an excerpt from her new book "Hacks" last week detailing how the DNC already had side fundraising agreements with Hillary Clinton. She recalled being sick to her stomach having to call Sanders and tell him how the DNC was seemingly working behind the scenes for his opponent.

In his response, Sanders, who had an inspired run against Clinton that lasted months longer than expected (many young voters weren't warming to Hillary), explains what the party needs to do to fix its image. He begins by taking on President Trump, but the juicy part is halfway through the piece.

Donna Brazile’s recent book makes it abundantly clear how important it is to bring fundamental reforms to the Democratic Party. The party cannot remain an institution largely dominated by the wealthy and inside-the-Beltway consultants. It must open its doors and welcome into its ranks millions of working people and young people who desperately want to be involved in determining the future of our nation.

Clinton's (brief) response to the Brazile allegations were not quite so urgent. During her appearance on "Late Night With Seth Meyers" this week, she claimed not to know what Brazile was even talking about.

"I didn't know what she was referring to, because as has now come out, that just wasn't the case," Clinton said.

Other Democrats are now distancing themselves from Brazile's account - even Sen. Elizabeth Warren (MA), who when first asked about the revelation, said matter-of-factly "yes" the primary was rigged.

Now, she says "the overall 2016 primary process was fair and Hillary made history."

Sanders notes in his op-ed that he and Clinton agreed they needed a Unity Reform Commission to fix some problems in the party.

"In a few weeks, this group will have its final meeting in Washington, D.C., and will decide if we are going to move forward in an inclusive way or continue with the current failed approach."

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