BREAKING: Rod Rosenstein Officially Resigns From the Department of Justice

|
|
Posted: Apr 29, 2019 5:40 PM
BREAKING: Rod Rosenstein Officially Resigns From the Department of Justice

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein will officially leave his position at the Department of Justice in the coming days after submitting his resignation letter to President Donald Trump Monday afternoon. 

"The median tenure of a Deputy Attorney General is 16 months, and few serve longer than two years. As I submit my resignation effective on May 11, I am grateful to you for the opportunity to serve; for the courtesy and humor you often display in our personal conversations; and for the goals you set in your inaugural address: patriotism, unity, safety, education, and prosperity, because 'a nation exists to serve it's citizens,'" Rosenstein wrote. "The Department of Justice pursues those goals while operating in accordance with the rule of law. The rule of law is the foundation of America. It secures our freedom, allows our citizens to flourish, and enables our nation to serve as a model of liberty and justice for all." 

"Our nation is safer, our elections are more secure, and our citizens are better informed about covert foreign influence efforts and schemes to commit fraud, steal intellectual property, and launch cyber attacks," he continued. "We keep the faith, we follow the rules, and we always put America first."

Rosenstein planned to leave DOJ months ago, but stayed on board until the release of the Special Counsel report about the 2016 presidential election. Rosenstein oversaw the investigation starting in May 2017 after former Attorney General Jeff Sessions recused himself.

Recommended
Mexico Is Paying for Trump's Wall
Wayne Allyn Root

During a press conference by Attorney General Bill Barr two weeks ago, Rosenstein stood beside him as he went over the release of the Mueller report. Barr, Rosenstein, Special Counsel Bob Mueller and Special Counsel attorneys worked together to release as much of the report to the public as possible within DOJ regulations and the law.