Trump: Quite Frankly, I Don't Care About the Political Ramifications of Shutting Down the Government for Border Security

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Posted: Jul 31, 2018 2:25 PM
Trump: Quite Frankly, I Don't Care About the Political Ramifications of Shutting Down the Government for Border Security

President Trump isn't backing down on his calls to shut down the government if Congress can't get a bill passed that includes a wall and additional border security.

The comments come after a meeting with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Speaker Paul Ryan last week. Both pushed back on the idea, McConnell did so publicly.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Friday that border wall funding would "probably" have to wait until after midterms, two days before President Donald Trump weighed in on the issue on Twitter, contradicting McConnell and threatening to push the government in to a shutdown.

On WHAS Radio on Friday, McConnell said that the wall funding issue is "something we do have a disagreement on," and that it would "probably" have to wait. He also said that a government shutdown is "not going to happen."

During a joint press conference with Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte Monday at the White House, President Trump reiterated his border stance and had no qualms about shutting down the government over a lack of wall funding.

"As far as the border is concerned and personally, if we don't get border security after many many years of talk within the United States, I would have no problem doing a shutdown. It's time we had proper border security," Trump said. "We're the laughing stock of the world. We have the worst immigration laws anywhere in the world."

"We need border security. Border security includes the wall but it includes many other things. We have to end the lottery. We have to end the chain. The chain is a disaster," he continued, adding that the U.S. must end catch-and-release. "I would certainly be willing to close it down...I would certainly be willing to consider a shutdown to get border security."  

The House and Senate have limited time before the current legislative session ends.