Two men charged under UK terror laws had 'Bomb Making' document

Reuters News
|
Posted: Oct 21, 2013 9:13 AM

LONDON (Reuters) - Two men charged with terrorism offences in Britain were in possession of a document called "Bomb Making" contained on electronic memory cards, a London court heard on Monday.

The men, who cannot be named for legal reasons, were arrested on October 13 in a car on an east London street by police officers who fired "Hatton rounds", special shotgun rounds designed to burst vehicle tires or blow the hinges off doors.

The pair, both aged 25, were charged on Sunday and made their first court appearance at Westminster Magistrates' Court on Monday morning. They were referred to during the public proceedings only as "AB" and "CD".

AB is charged with an offence under section 5 of the Terrorism Act 2006, which relates to the preparation of acts of terrorism. The details of the alleged offence cannot be published for legal reasons.

Both AB and CD are charged with a lesser offence under section 58 of the Terrorism Act 2000, which relates to the collection or possession of information of a kind likely to be useful to a person preparing an act of terrorism. That charge relates to the "Bomb Making" document.

In addition, CD is charged with an offence under section 4 of the Identity Documents Act 2010, which relates to the possession of false identity documents with improper intention.

Judge Michael Snow referred the case to the Central Criminal Court, also known as the Old Bailey, where a first hearing will take place on November 18. The men were remanded in custody.

Two other men arrested during the same police operation were released without charge on Saturday.

British law enforcement agencies are constantly monitoring people or groups suspected of involvement in terrorism.

London has been the target of a number of plots, including on July 7, 2005, when four Islamist militants blew themselves up on underground trains and on a bus during the morning rush hour, killing 52 people and injuring hundreds.

(Reporting by Estelle Shirbon; editing by Mike Collett-White)