Latest developments in Arab world's unrest

AP News
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Posted: Jul 08, 2011 4:35 PM
Latest developments in Arab world's unrest

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SYRIA

Hundreds of thousands of Syrians pour into the streets of the opposition stronghold Hama, bolstered by a gesture of support from the American and French ambassadors who visit the city where a massacre nearly 30 years ago came to symbolize the ruthlessness of the Assad dynasty. The visit by U.S. Ambassador Robert Ford draws swift condemnation from the Syrian government, which says the unauthorized trip is proof that Washington is inciting violence in the Arab nation.

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EGYPT

Tens of thousands of Egyptians brave scorching summer heat to hold one of their biggest protests in months, filling streets in Cairo and other cities to demand trials for members of Hosni Mubarak's regime and express frustration with the slow pace of change. The exhilaration of Mubarak's ouster on Feb. 11 after 18 days of mass protests has yielded to widespread frustration that "the revolution" has stalled.

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YEMEN

Supporters and opponents of President Ali Abdullah Saleh stage competing marches in Yemen's capital, a day after his first TV appearance since flying to Saudi Arabia a month ago to treat wounds sustained in an attack on his palace. The video shows the leader with casts on his arms and visibly weakened after a series of operations, reinforcing speculation that he won't return to Yemen soon.

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LIBYA

An agitated Moammar Gadhafi lashes out at those seeking to push him from power, warning in an audio message broadcast on state TV that NATO and other enemies will be trampled "under the feet of the Libyan masses." In the capital of Tripoli, thousands rally in the main square for mass prayers and a show of support for Gadhafi. The gathering comes a week after another large pro-government demonstration there, showing that Gadhafi can still muster significant support in his stronghold, Tripoli.

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BAHRAIN

Bahrain's top Shiite cleric criticizes reconciliation talks between the Shiite-led opposition and the kingdom's Sunni rulers, accusing the monarchy of using the U.S.-supported dialogue to delay democratic reforms. The remarks by Sheik Isa Qassim underline the deep tensions in the tiny, but strategically important nation, home to the U.S. Navy's 5th Fleet, after five months of pro-democracy protests.