Latest developments in Arab world's unrest

AP News
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Posted: Jun 14, 2011 2:52 PM
Latest developments in Arab world's unrest

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SYRIA

Syrian tanks and the government's most loyal troops push into more towns and villages, trying to snuff out any chance that the uprising against President Bashar Assad could gain a base for a wider armed rebellion. Facing the most serious threat to his family's 40-year ruling dynasty, Assad has abandoned most pretenses of reform as his military seals off strategic areas in the north and east _ including the town of Jisr al-Shughour, which was spinning out of government control before the military moved in.

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YEMEN

Hundreds of thousands of Yemenis demonstrate in nearly every major city of the country, demanding trial for the family and close aides of the ailing president. They are the largest protests since President Ali Abdullah Saleh went to neighboring Saudi Arabia for medical treatment for injuries suffered in a June 3 attack on his compound. Some of Saleh's family and closest aides remain behind, and Yemen remains locked in a power struggle between the president's allies and tribesmen demanding an end to the regime's nearly 33-year rule.

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LIBYA

A NATO airstrike hits an area near Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's compound in the capital, as NATO military leaders voice concerns about sustaining the operations if the alliance mission drags on. Britain's top naval officer, Admiral Mark Stanhope, warns that his nation _ its military hobbled by severe budget cuts and the continuing cost of the Afghan war _ would face hard decision if the Libya mission is not resolved by September. East of the capital, alliance aircraft begin dropping leaflets warning government troops to abandon their posts outside Zlitan, which lies just west of the rebel-held port city of Misrata.

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EGYPT

A nighttime curfew imposed just after a popular revolution erupted in Egypt in late January is lifted. As the protests intensified, so did the curfew _ from 11 hours a day to 17 hours a day. It was eventually scaled back after President Hosni Mubarak fell from power, from 2 a.m. to 5 a.m. As the first such restriction on Cairo since 1986, the curfew was widely ignored by the city's residents.

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LEBANON

Members of Lebanon's Western-backed coalition, newly in the opposition, warn that the country's new government is a tool for Syria and the militant Hezbollah and represents a "coup against the democratic system." Lebanese Prime Minister Najib Mikati's new Cabinet is dominated by Hezbollah and its allies, taking office five months after a walkout by the militant group dissolved the previous government.

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TUNISIA

Tunisia's deposed president will be tried in absentia on June 20 by civil and military courts on charges ranging from embezzlement and murder to drug trafficking. Prime Minister Beji Caid Essebsi adds that the extradition request to Saudi Arabia, where he fled, remains unanswered. Zine Abidine Ben Ali ruled Tunisia for 23 years until a monthlong popular uprising forced him to flee on Jan. 14. Tunisia's Ministry of Justice says there are 93 counts pending against him, including plotting against the security of the state, murder, abuse of power, embezzlement, money laundering and drug trafficking.