No bond for suspect in N. Carolina teen's disappearance

AP News
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Posted: Jun 26, 2017 8:36 PM

LAWRENCEVILLE, Ga. (AP) — A man was denied bail Monday in the case of a North Carolina teenager who was found in a Georgia home Saturday after disappearing more than a year ago.

Local news media report that 31-year-old Michael Wysolovski (weye-suh-LAHV'-skee) sat emotionless in a Gwinnett County, Georgia, courtroom as a magistrate judge read the charges. He did not enter a plea.

Wysolovski is charged with false imprisonment, interference with custody, aggravated sodomy, and first degree cruelty to children. It's not clear if he has an attorney to speak for him. Supporters declined to speak to reporters as they left court Monday. His next court appearance is July 7.

FBI spokeswoman Shelley Lynch said Sunday that the victim, now 17, was reunited with her parents after being found in Duluth, about 30 miles (48 kilometers) northeast of Atlanta. The Associated Press isn't naming her or her parents because it doesn't usually identify victims of sexual assault.

Police say the girl made contact Friday with a woman online in Romania and told her she was being held against her will. The girl didn't know where she was, but the Romanian woman contacted her parents in North Carolina. Later, the girl sent a picture taken looking out of a window of the house. Authorities somehow pieced together that she was being held at a two-story house in Duluth, and the FBI raided it early Saturday morning, retrieving the girl and arresting Wysolovski.

"They did enough research and gumshoe work to figure out where that young woman was being held. That's a nice piece of work," former FBI assistant director Chris Swecker told Charlotte's WSOC-TV.

Many things about the case remain unclear, such as how the teen initially reached Wysolovski, as well as whether he held her the whole time in Duluth.

Her mother said Wysolovski enticed the daughter into his car and took her to Georgia "and she pretty much had to stay there the whole time."

According to the Gwinnett County property records, Wysolovski bought the home in Duluth on April 14 of this year. It's unclear if he lived there before then.

Her parents said the girl has a form of autism and they weren't sure they would ever see her again.

"She is just so happy to be home. Even the littlest things make her happy," the mother said.

Neighbors said they had seen brief glimpses of the girl, such as unloading groceries once, but had no real contact with her.

"It makes me sick to my stomach, actually that someone could do that," said Jennifer Elmore, who lives next door to the home.

In addition to the charges Wysolovski faces in Georgia, federal charges are possible as well as more state charges in North Carolina.