The Latest: River monitoring beefed up in protest camp area

AP News
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Posted: Feb 02, 2017 3:23 PM
The Latest: River monitoring beefed up in protest camp area

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The Latest on the proposed four-state, $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline (all times local):

2:25 p.m.

The Army Corps of Engineers plans to install two mobile stream gauges on the Cannonball River in North Dakota area where Dakota Access pipeline opponents have camped for months.

The National Weather Service says minor flooding is almost certain this spring in the area. Floodwaters could wash camp debris into the Missouri River.

There's a permanent gauge about 15 miles west of the camp. The Corps says the U.S. Geological Survey will deploy two mobile gauges at spots closer to the camp, to help provide short-term water level data.

The camp is being cleaned up this week in advance of the flooding season. Some in camp have vowed to remain to fight the pipeline they believe threatens the environment. Developer Energy Transfer Partners says the pipeline is safe.

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1:45 p.m.

The developer of the $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline is asking a federal judge to keep some information shielded from the public while a court case over the project continues.

Attorneys for Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners say some details such as spill response plans outline pipeline features that could be targeted by anti-pipeline activists.

ETP is battling with the Army Corps of Engineers over permission to finish the disputed pipeline. The court fight also includes the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux. The tribes believe the project threatens drinking water and sacred sites, which ETP denies.

The Corps and tribes didn't immediately file formal responses to ETP's request. But their attorneys in email exchanges questioned the need for a protective order.

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10:10 a.m.

Standing Rock Sioux Chairman Dave Archambault is criticizing Dakota Access oil pipeline opponents who set up a camp on private land.

Archambault says the move undermines the tribe's efforts to make a legitimate case against the pipeline, which the tribe says threatens its drinking water.

Authorities arrested 74 protesters after they set up teepees Wednesday on land owned by the pipeline developer. Protesters said they were peacefully assembling on land they believe rightfully belongs to American Indians.

The site is near the main protest camp that has existed for months on federal land, and still is home to several hundred protesters. Archambault has called on that camp to disband in recent weeks, saying "the fight is no longer here, but in the halls and courts of the federal government."

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9:30 a.m.

An American Indian activist who unsuccessfully ran for Congress last fall is among 74 Dakota Access pipeline opponents who were arrested in North Dakota after setting up camp on private land.

Formal charges are pending against Chase Iron Eyes, who's been helping organize opposition to the $3.8 billion pipeline the Standing Rock Sioux says threatens its drinking water. He didn't immediately respond to a request for comment Thursday.

Iron Eyes and others were arrested Wednesday after setting up camp on land that authorities say is owned by the pipeline developer. Protesters said they were peacefully assembling on land they believe rightfully belongs to American Indians.

The site was near the main protest camp that has existed for months on federal land, and still is home to several hundred people.