The Latest: Archbishop says archdiocese disclosed all assets

AP News
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Posted: May 24, 2016 7:22 PM

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — The Latest on attorneys accusing the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis of hiding assets (all times local):

6: 20 p.m.

The archbishop of St. Paul and Minneapolis says his archdiocese has cooperated fully in bankruptcy proceedings and has disclosed all its assets.

Archbishop Bernard Hebda responded Tuesday to accusations from attorneys who say the church is sheltering more than $1 billion in assets to avoid big payouts to abuse survivors as part of the church's bankruptcy case. The attorneys say the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis has some $1.7 billion in assets — far more than the $49 million it lists in a filing this week.

Hebda said in a statement that the archdiocese will be filing its reorganization plan this week. And he says it will show the church's commitment to a just and timely resolution of all claims.

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12:40 p.m.

Creditors and an attorney for victims of clergy abuse are accusing a Minnesota archdiocese of vastly understating its assets in bankruptcy.

They say the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis has some $1.7 billion in assets — far more than the $49 million it lists in a filing this week. In court papers, they accuse the archdiocese of undervaluing assets and tucking money away in corporations to shield it from creditors.

Jeff Anderson, an attorney for hundreds of people claiming sexual abuse by priests, calls it a "massive scheme" to defraud creditors and deny fair resolution of claims.

An archdiocese spokesman did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The archdiocese filed bankruptcy in January 2015 as it faced an onslaught of new abuse claims.

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12:15 p.m.

Creditors and an attorney for victims of clergy abuse are accusing a Minnesota archdiocese of vastly understating its assets in bankruptcy.

They say the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis has some $1.7 billion in assets — far more than the roughly $45 million it listed in a bankruptcy filing early last year. In court papers, they accuse the archdiocese of undervaluing assets and tucking money away in corporations to shield it from creditors.

Jeff Anderson, an attorney for hundreds of people claiming sexual abuse by priests, calls it a "massive scheme" to defraud creditors and deny fair resolution of claims.

An archdiocese spokesman did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The archdiocese filed bankruptcy in January 2015 as it faced an onslaught of new abuse claims.