The Latest: Princeton president credits student group

AP News
|
Posted: Apr 04, 2016 4:50 PM
The Latest: Princeton president credits student group

PRINCETON, N.J. (AP) — The Latest on Princeton's decision to keep Woodrow Wilson's name on its public policy school (all times local):

4:45 p.m.

The president of Princeton University says the black students who called for Woodrow Wilson's name to be removed from the school for public policy have changed the way people talk about the Nobel Peace Prize winner and segregationist.

Princeton announced Monday that it will keep the former U.S. president's name on its public policy school, despite calls to remove it because he was pro-segregation.

In an interview with The Associated Press, Princeton President Christopher Eisgruber says the process that emerged from the 32-hour student sit-in last fall helped him learn more about one of the university's most celebrated alumni.

Going forward, Eisgruber says Princeton has an obligation to highlight not only Wilson's "towering achievements" but also his "severe deficiencies."

Wilson was U.S. president from 1913 until 1921. He graduated from Princeton and also was its president.

___

9:30 a.m.

Princeton University will keep Woodrow Wilson's name on its public policy school, despite calls to remove it because of his racist views.

The Ivy League university's board of trustees announced the decision Monday. It comes after a black student group demanded it be removed and for changes to the social and academic climate on campus.

Wilson was U.S. president from 1913 until 1921. He graduated from Princeton and also was its president. He is regarded as a leading progressive but also supported segregation.

Dozens of students from a group called the Black Justice League had protested inside Princeton President Christopher Eisgruber's office for 32 hours beginning Nov. 18. Their action came amid a wave of activism across the country around racial issues on campuses.

___

2:30 a.m.

Princeton University is launching a new exhibit aimed at exploring the legacy of former President Woodrow Wilson.

"In the Nation's Service? Wilson Revisited" opens Monday at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public Policy and International Affairs. The exhibit features panels highlighting Wilson's life that acknowledge his bigotry alongside his progressivism.

In November, a black student group demanded Wilson's name be removed from the public policy school. A decision is expected soon.

Wilson served as president of Princeton from 1902 to 1910 and became the country's 28th president in 1913, serving until 1921. He won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1919.

But he also supported segregation, including in the federal government, rolling back progress for the emerging black middle class in the nation's capital.