10 Things to Know for Friday

AP News
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Posted: Dec 03, 2015 9:11 PM
10 Things to Know for Friday

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Friday:

1. WHY BLOODBATH COULD HAVE BEEN FAR WORSE

The husband and wife who killed 14 people at a California social services center had stockpiled thousands of rounds of additional ammunition and 12 pipe bombs before they were killed by police.

2. DEFENSE SECRETARY ORDERS US MILITARY TO OPEN ALL COMBAT JOBS TO WOMEN

The decision signals a formal recognition that thousands of women served, and many were wounded or killed, in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

3. WHO'S LINING UP TO BATTLE ISLAMIC STATE EXTREMISTS IN SYRIA

As Britain begins airstrikes, Germany is preparing to send troops and aircraft to the region.

4. HELP ON WAY FOR AMERICA'S AGING HIGHWAYS, BRIDGES

A 5-year, $305 billion measure moving through Congress boosts highway and transit spending and assures states that federal help will be available for major projects.

5. SENATE OKS BILL AIMED AT CRIPPLING 'OBAMACARE,' PLANNED PARENTHOOD

After the House's expected approval, the bill will be the first to reach Obama's desk demolishing his health care law and blocking Planned Parenthood's federal money.

6. US CHARGES 16 MORE IN FIFA CORRUPTION PROBE

The newest indictment takes down an entire generation of soccer leaders in South America, a bedrock of FIFA and World Cup history

7. WHICH FEATURE IS BEING TESTED BY FACEBOOK

The tool would enable users to shoot video with their smartphones and allow other people to see it live on the social network.

8. COLDPLAY SCORES BIG GIG

The British rock band will perform during halftime of the Super Bowl, says a spokesperson for Pepsi, which is sponsoring the show.

9. INTERNET-READY GIZMOS UNDERCUTTING TRADITIONAL TV-WATCHING

More and more people are viewing content on smartphones, tablets or TV-connected devices like streaming boxes and game consoles, Nielsen data show.

10. HOW ORGANIZERS OF RIO OLYMPICS ARE CUTTING EXPENSES

The 10,500 athletes at next year's Games won't have air conditioning in their bedrooms unless someone pays for it.