10 Things to Know for Friday

AP News
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Posted: Sep 10, 2015 9:00 PM
10 Things to Know for Friday

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

1. WHAT OBAMA WON AFTER VOTE ON NUCLEAR DEAL WITH IRAN

Senate Democrats upheld the agreement, overcoming ferocious GOP opposition and delivering the president a legacy-making victory on his top foreign policy priority.

2. DIRE CONDITIONS FOR MIGRANTS TRYING TO REACH EUROPE

Soaked to the bone and ankle deep in mud, thousands of them are finding that their path to a new life is strewn with hardship.

3. MINNEAPOLIS SUBURB SHAKEN BY FAMILY TRAGEDY

Five people, including three children, were found dead in their lakeside home in Greenwood in what police said appeared to be a murder-suicide.

4. LATEST BLUNT COMMENT FROM TRUMP PROVOKES CRITICISM FROM BOTH DEMOCRATS AND REPUBLICANS

After the real estate magnate insulted the physical appearance of Carly Fiorina, Bobby Jindal called him an "egomaniacal madman," while Hillary Clinton said he "seems to delight in insulting women every chance he gets."

5. AN APOLOGY FROM NEW YORK CITY'S POLICE COMMISSIONER

William Bratton told former tennis star James Blake his arrest outside a Manhattan hotel was a case of mistaken identity.

6. WHERE RUSSIA SEEMS TO BE SENDING TROOPS

Israel suspects Moscow has been dispatching military forces to Syria to bolster President Bashar Assad's embattled army.

7. PHOENIX-AREA DRIVERS JITTERY AFTER ATTACKS

Eleven vehicles have been struck by projectiles, and the police are on the hunt to find out who is behind the shootings.

8. STEELERS AND PATRIOTS CLASH AS FOOTBALL SEASON STARTS

After getting his ban overturned, Tom Brady leads New England against Pittsburgh's Ben Roethlisberger in the opener.

9. WHY COLBERT'S SHOW ALMOST DIDN'T GO ON THE AIR

Scheduling and technical glitches temporarily prevented producers from sending the finished product to the network.

10. YOU SAY YOU LIKE COFFEE?

Well, so did ancient Americans, and they reached far and wide to get it. Scientists say the early trade covered all the way from Mexico to the Southwest to the South.