10 Things to Know for Tuesday

AP News
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Posted: Aug 17, 2015 9:04 PM
10 Things to Know for Tuesday

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Tuesday:

1. TRUMP DIVIDES GOP FIELD WITH IMMIGRATION PLAN

The Republican frontrunner says he supports deporting U.S.-born children of illegal immigrants, which causes a stir among his rivals.

2. SHOCK, DESPERATION FOLLOW SHRINE BOMBING IN THAILAND

The pipe bomb, detonated at Bangkok's Erawan Shrine, killed at least 18 people and injured 117.

3. WHY PENTAGON PLANS TO INCREASE DRONE USE BY 50 PERCENT

Top military leaders want to put more of the unmanned aircraft into service, in part to help counter escalating aggression from Russia and China.

4. IRS: COMPUTER HACK MUCH BIGGER THAN FIRST THOUGHT

Thieves may have stolen personal information from 334,000 taxpayers, more than double the number of potential victims originally disclosed.

5. WHO'S BEING CALLED UP TO HELP FIGHT WESTERN WILDFIRES

Two hundred active-duty troops will deploy to battle the persistent fires, fueled by tinder-dry conditions in Washington state, California, Montana and elsewhere across the region.

6. WHAT DOOMED INDONESIA AIRLINER WAS CARRYING

Along with 54 people onboard, the jet that crashed in the Papua mountains had nearly $500,000 in cash for fuel aid.

7. HOW STATES ARE FINDING WAYS TO PAY FOR ROAD REPAIRS

Facing shortfalls in federal funds, nearly one-third of the states are raising billions of dollars for highway projects through higher fuel taxes, vehicle fees and bonds.

8. OLDEST US VETERAN DIES AT 110

Emma Didlake, who served in the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps during World War II, had met President Obama in the White House about a month ago.

9. 'STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON' LIKELY TO INSPIRE IMITATIONS

With its $60.2 million debut, the N.W.A. biopic could encourage studios to embrace more racially charged stories.

10. LABOR BOARD BLOCKS BID TO UNIONIZE COLLEGE ATHLETES

The new ruling strikes down a 2014 decision by a regional NLRB director who said scholarship football players are employees under U.S. law and thus entitled to organize.