The Latest: Fired Ohio officer posts bail, gets out of jail

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Posted: Jul 30, 2015 8:09 PM
The Latest: Fired Ohio officer posts bail, gets out of jail

CINCINNATI (AP) — Here are the latest developments in the case of the July 19 fatal shooting of a motorist after a traffic stop by a University of Cincinnati police officer (all times local):

8 p.m.

A fired University of Cincinnati police officer charged with murder in the shooting of a motorist during a traffic stop has posted bail and been released from jail.

A judge set bail at $1 million for Ray Tensing, who has pleaded not guilty to murder and voluntary manslaughter charges in the July 19 shooting death of Samuel DuBose.

The Hamilton County Court clerk's website shows Tensing was allowed to post 10 percent of the bail. A sheriff's spokesman says Tensing was released Thursday evening.

DuBose's death comes amid months of national scrutiny of police dealings with African-Americans, especially those killed by officers. Tensing is white. DuBose was black. Authorities haven't focused on race in the death.

Messages left for Tensing's attorney haven't been returned.

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4 p.m.

A fired University of Cincinnati police officer charged with murder in the shooting of a motorist during a traffic stop once used a stun gun on another motorist he said resisted arrest and assaulted him.

Officer Ray Tensing pleaded not guilty Thursday in the July 19 shooting of 43-year-old Samuel DuBose in Cincinnati.

Records from the Greenhills Police Department show that Tensing used a stun gun while working there in January 2012. Another motorist said he saw the suspect fighting Tensing and trying to get away and Tensing used the stun gun after the suspect continued fighting despite warnings.

Tensing reported cuts and bruises to some fingers. Few other details are in the records.

Greenhills' police chief says Tensing did a good job while at that department for over three years.

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10:50 a.m.

The attorney for the fired University of Cincinnati police officer charged with murder says that there are "two sides" to the case and that the much-viewed video of the traffic-stop shooting can be interpreted differently than the prosecutor's version.

Attorney Stewart Mathews says, "The case will be tried and decided in a court." He spoke Thursday outside the Hamilton County courtroom where a judge set $1 million bond for Ray Tensing. Mathews entered a not guilty plea for Tensing, who is charged with murder in the killing of 43-year-old motorist Samuel DuBose.

Mathews says Tensing has felt "like he's been run over by a train from the start of this case and it continues."

Mathews says Tensing is "very depressed" and "in shock at this point."

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10:10 a.m.

A University of Cincinnati police officer who shot a motorist after stopping him over a missing front license plate has pleaded not guilty to charges of murder and voluntary manslaughter.

Twenty-five-year-old Ray Tensing wore a striped jail uniform at his arraignment Thursday. Bond was set at $1 million.

Tensing was indicted Wednesday in the July 19 death of 43-year-old Samuel DuBose. Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters scoffed at Tensing's claim that he was dragged by DuBose's car, saying the officer "purposely killed him."

Tensing's attorney says his client feared for his life and didn't intend to kill DuBose.

DuBose's death comes amid months of national scrutiny of police dealings with African-Americans, especially those killed by officers. Tensing is white and DuBose is black. Authorities so far have not focused on race in the death.

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This story has been corrected to show that Tensing was charged with voluntary, not involuntary, manslaughter.

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8:30 a.m.

The NAACP says the indictment of a white University of Cincinnati policeman in the shooting death of a black driver after a traffic stop illustrates the kind of action needed when excessive force is used against unarmed people.

A murder charge was announced Wednesday for the officer, Ray Tensing, in the July 19 shooting of 43-year-old Samuel DuBose. Tensing's attorney says the now-fired officer didn't intend to kill DuBose.

A statement from NAACP President Cornell William Brooks calls the indictment "encouraging" but notes it's merely the start of a potentially long legal process. He says the organization will closely monitor the case as it seeks accountability in that case and others involving excessive force.

Tensing's initial court appearance is scheduled for 10 a.m. Thursday.

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2 a.m.

Some of the sharpest criticism of a police officer after the slaying of an unarmed black man is coming from top law enforcement and Cincinnati officials this time.

Wednesday's indictment of University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing on a charge of murder in the traffic-stop shooting was applauded by the victim's family and some community activists. It also won approval from city officials in a city roiled by racial violence that erupted in 2001 after an unarmed black man was killed by Cincinnati police after a string of earlier shootings by officers.

Forty-three-year-old Samuel DuBose's July 19 shooting death comes amid months of national scrutiny of police dealings with African-Americans, especially those killed by officers. Authorities so far have not focused on race in DuBose's death.