10 Things to Know for Today

AP News
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Posted: Apr 03, 2015 9:13 AM
10 Things to Know for Today

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

1. IRAN, WORLD POWERS FACE TOUGH NUKE TALKS

With one phase of negotiations over, the sides now have an ambitious to-do list that — if implemented — will cut into Tehran's bomb-capable technology.

2. INDIANA, ARKANSAS TRY TO STEM RELIGIOUS OBJECTIONS UPROAR

The two states are now looking to move forward after taking different approaches to changing the legislation to ease concerns about discrimination.

3. PACE OF HIRING WEAKENS

Harsh winter weather and lackluster construction activity push U.S. new jobs down to their lowest level since December 2013.

4. HOW ALLIES TRYING TO HELP SEN. MENENDEZ

They launch a public relations campaign to support the politician through a long legal fight over federal corruption charges.

5. GOVERNMENT COMMITTED TO STOPPING 'HOMEGROWN EXTREMISTS'

Prosecutors say the arrests of two New York City women who talked about recipes for homemade bombs show the authorities will do everything they can to prevent domestic terrorism.

6. WHERE RACISM REMAINS LINGERING PROBLEM

College students and administrators are struggling to deal with racist incidents on campuses despite repeated condemnations.

7. RUSSIA FOCUSES ON TRAINING REBELS IN UKRAINE

This is a tactical shift apparently aimed at minimizing Moscow's military presence in the neighboring country, part of an effort to persuade the West to lift sanctions.

8. DISASTER EXPO SHOWS INNOVATIONS IN THRIVING JAPANESE INDUSTRY

Some of the products on display feature new materials, but many are just inventive solutions for challenges such as quickly getting people out of harm's way.

9. TASTES GREAT, LESS STICKY

The trip from tree tap to bar tap underway again this spring in upstate New York as a brewery uses maple sugar to create its maple amber craft beer.

10. WHY TOP BLACK COACHES FORM ORGANIZATION

A group headlined by Tubby Smith and Shaka Smart are setting it up to address the dwindling numbers of minority head coaches in college basketball.