The Latest: Marker honors interracial couple who changed law

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Posted: Jun 12, 2017 2:30 PM
The Latest: Marker honors interracial couple who changed law

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The Latest on the unveiling of a historical marker honoring a Virginia couple that successfully fought a ban on interracial marriage (all times local):

2:25 p.m.

The couple whose love brought down laws against interracial marriage are commemorated on a historical marker in Virginia's capital city.

The marker honoring Richard and Mildred Loving was unveiled Monday in Richmond outside the building that once housed the Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals.

The Lovings were jailed in 1958 for violating the Virginia's prohibition on interracial marriage. Virginia's highest court ruled against them before they won in the U.S. Supreme Court.

The ceremony was held on the 50th anniversary of the high court decision striking down Virginia's anti-interracial marriage law and similar ones in about one-third of the states.

Claire Gastanaga is executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Virginia. She called the Lovings "civil rights pioneers" who had the courage to stand up for the right to love.

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3 a.m.

A landmark Supreme Court ruling that struck down laws banning interracial marriage is being celebrated in Virginia 50 years later.

Gov. Terry McAuliffe and other officials will dedicate a historical marker Monday commemorating the 1967 ruling and the Virginia couple behind the case.

Richard and Mildred Loving were thrown into jail in 1958 for violating the Virginia's prohibition on interracial marriage. They fought the law to the U.S. Supreme Court, which struck down Virginia's law and similar ones in about one-third of the states.

The historical marker is being placed alongside the Richmond building that once housed the Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals, which ruled against the Lovings before their U.S. Supreme Court victory.

Mildred Loving died in 2008. Her husband was killed by a drunk driver in 1975.